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Are There Different Types Of Alzheimer’s

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy/brain Injury

Chapter 3: The different types of dementia

Initial symptoms: Symptoms of brain injury include loss of consciousness, memory loss, personality and behavior changes, and slow, slurred speech.

Progression: While symptoms from a single concussion are often temporary and resolve with appropriate treatment, chronic traumatic encephalopathy typically develops over time from repeated head injuries and is generally not reversible. Later symptoms include poor decision-making ability, aggression, impaired motor function and inability to communicate effectively.

Prognosis: Life expectancy varies according to the severity of injuries.

How Alzheimer’s Disease Is Treated

There’s currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, but medicines are available that can help relieve some of the symptoms.

Various other types of support are also available to help people with Alzheimer’s live as independently as possible, such as making changes to your home environment so it’s easier to move around and remember daily tasks.

Psychological treatments such as cognitive stimulation therapy may also be offered to help support your memory, problem solving skills and language ability.

Read more about treating Alzheimer’s disease.

How Does Alzheimer’s Disease Progress

The rate of progression of the disease varies from person to person.

However, the disease does lead eventually to complete dependence and finally death, usually from another illness such as pneumonia. A person may live from three to twenty years with Alzheimer’s disease, with the average being seven to ten years.

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Stage : Mild Dementia

At this stage, individuals may start to become socially withdrawn and show changes in personality and mood. Denial of symptoms as a defense mechanism is commonly seen in stage 4. Behaviors to look for include:

  • Difficulty remembering things about one’s personal history
  • Disorientation
  • Difficulty recognizing faces and people

In stage 4 dementia, individuals have no trouble recognizing familiar faces or traveling to familiar locations. However, patients in this stage will often avoid challenging situations in order to hide symptoms or prevent stress or anxiety.

Early Onset Alzheimers Disease

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Although age is the main risk factor for Alzheimers disease, this is not just a condition that affects older adults.

According to the Alzheimers Association, early onset Alzheimers disease affects around 200,000 U.S. adults under the age of 65 years. Many people with this condition are in their 40s or 50s.

In many cases, doctors do not know why younger people develop this condition. Several rare genes can cause the condition. When there is a genetic cause, it is known as familial Alzheimers disease.

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What Are The Early Warning Signs Of Dementia To Watch For

Now that you know the four common types of dementia, there are 10 early symptoms you should watch for if you begin to notice changes in your loved one. Noticing memory problems in your loved one doesnt immediately mean its dementia.

There needs to be at least two types of impairment that are significantly impacting the person: memory loss plus difficulty with communication, language, focus, or reasoning.

Here are 10 early symptoms of dementia to watch for:

  • Short-term memory changes such as forgetting where they placed something, what they ate for lunch, or what they were supposed to do that day
  • Trouble finding the right words to express their thoughts
  • Mood changes, personality shifts, and depression
  • Apathy, or losing interest in hobbies or social activities
  • Trouble completing their usual daily tasks or learning new things
  • Confusion as they begin to forget familiar faces or appropriate social interactions
  • Difficulty following along in conversations or TV programs
  • Losing their sense of direction
  • Repeating tasks, phrases, or questions because they forgot it already was addressed
  • Fear and trouble adapting to new experiences
  • If your loved one is beginning to experience these symptoms, talk to their doctor to rule out any other factors and get a proper diagnosis. An early diagnosis and treatment can be beneficial, so dont delay in getting help.

    How Does Alzheimer’s Disease Affect The Brain

    Scientists continue to unravel the complex brain changes involved in Alzheimers disease. Changes in the brain may begin a decade or more before symptoms appear. During this very early stage of Alzheimers, toxic changes are taking place in the brain, including abnormal buildups of proteins that form amyloid plaques and tau tangles. Previously healthy neurons stop functioning, lose connections with other neurons, and die. Many other complex brain changes are thought to play a role in Alzheimers as well.

    The damage initially appears to take place in the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex, which are parts of the brain that are essential in forming memories. As more neurons die, additional parts of the brain are affected and begin to shrink. By the final stage of Alzheimers, damage is widespread and brain tissue has shrunk significantly.

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    Four Different Types Of Dementia

    Think of dementia as a tree. Dementia is the tree trunk and the branches are the various forms of dementia that extend from the trunk, each with their own set of leaves, representing the signs and symptoms. Each branch is slightly different from one another, but they still belong to the same tree.

    This guide will look at four different types of dementia: Alzheimers disease , Vascular Dementia , Lewy Body Dementia , and Frontotemporal Dementia . Youll notice that these types of dementia share similar symptoms, but there are differences in the number of cases, signs, and treatments for each.

    What Is Alzheimer’s Disease

    Is There Really a Difference Among Types of Dementia?

    Alzheimers disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting up to 70% of all people with dementia. It was first recorded in 1907 by Dr Alois Alzheimer. Dr Alzheimer reported the case of Auguste Deter, a middle-aged woman with dementia and specific changes in her brain. For the next 60 years Alzheimers disease was considered a rare condition that affected people under the age of 65. It was not until the 1970s that Dr Robert Katzman declared that “senile dementia” and Alzheimers disease were the same condition and that neither were a normal part of aging.

    Alzheimers disease can be either sporadic or familial.

    Sporadic Alzheimer’s disease can affect adults at any age, but usually occurs after age 65 and is the most common form of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Familial Alzheimers disease is a very rare genetic condition, caused by a mutation in one of several genes. The presence of mutated genes means that the person will eventually develop Alzheimer’s disease, usually in their 40’s or 50’s.

    The Healthy Human Brain

    Behind the ears and temples are the temporal lobes of the brain. These regions process speech and working memory, and also higher emotions such as empathy, morality and regret. Beneath the forebrain are the more primitive brain regions such as the limbic system. The limbic system is a structure that is common to all mammals and processes our desires and many emotions. Also in the limbic system is the hippocampus a region that is vital for forming new memories.

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    Memory Loss Or Dementia

    In short, dementia, whatever the type, is characterized by various symptoms like memory losses, learning difficulties, language troubles, confusion, mood and personality changes, bad decisions, difficulty in thinking, depression, loss of interest for some activities, etc. Thus, we cant only consider memory disorders to determine if a parent is affected by Alzheimers disease or another type of dementia. In fact, cognitive problems associated with memory may, sometimes, have another origin, like drugs interaction, drinking alcohol, depression, thyroid problems or a lack of vitamins.

    If you think one of your parents suffers from Alzheimer of dementia, it is better to visit a doctor, specialized in geriatrics for example. Tell them about the behaviours and troubles that seem to touch the concerned person, in this way the doctor will be able to determine if it actually is dementia, and what type it is. Then they will direct you towards adapted treatments or approaches.

    About Visavie Home Care Services

    Since 1994, Visavie offers seniors in-home care services to preserve their autonomy and especially, continue to take advantage of the comfort of their home.

    Besides, researches have shown that for a person with Alzheimers disease, remaining in a familiar surrounding helps manage the challenges related to memory loss.

    Stage : Moderately Severe Dementia

    When the patient begins to forget the names of their children, spouse, or primary caregivers, they are most likely entering stage 6 of dementia and will need full time care. In the sixth stage, patients are generally unaware of their surroundings, cannot recall recent events, and have skewed memories of their personal past. Caregivers and loved ones should watch for:

    • Delusional behavior

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    What To Do If You Suspect Alzheimers Disease

    Getting checked by your healthcare provider can help determine if the symptoms you are experiencing are related to Alzheimers disease, or a more treatable conditions such as a vitamin deficiency or a side effect from medication. Early and accurate diagnosis also provides opportunities for you and your family to consider financial planning, develop advance directives, enroll in clinical trials, and anticipate care needs.

    There Are Five Different Types Of Dementia

    Should drivers diagnosed with dementia face a re
  • Alzheimers DiseaseAlzheimer is a consequence of an abnormal shrinkage of the brain. This affects every brain functions and causes significant changes, in particular regarding the behaviour and interpersonal relationships. The first signs of this disease include difficulty to remember. For example, the day, the place or recent events, or even a depressive behaviour.
  • Dementia with Lewy BodiesSimilar to Alzheimer, this kind of dementia also presents features near Parkinson, such as tremors and stiffness. It comes with sleeping disorders and visual hallucinations.
  • Vascular DementiaEvery stroke or vascular accident causes damages to the brain as well as tissue loss. Thus, after some little crisis, Alzheimer-like symptoms can appear, in particular, memory disorders, bad decision making, and difficulty in planning.
  • Frontotemporal DementiaIn this case, the neurodegeneration affects more the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, which causes important changes in behaviour and personality. The affected person can also show language troubles, difficulty to move and memory losses. The first symptoms appear sooner than for Alzheimer, that is to say around 60 years old.
  • Mixed Dementia This one is a situation where someone is affected by two types of dementia. The most common combination is Alzheimers disease with vascular dementia.
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    Health Environmental And Lifestyle Factors That May Contribute To Alzheimer’s Disease

    Research suggests that a host of factors beyond genetics may play a role in the development and course of Alzheimer’s disease. There is a great deal of interest, for example, in the relationship between cognitive decline and vascular conditions such as heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure, as well as metabolic conditions such as diabetes and obesity. Ongoing research will help us understand whether and how reducing risk factors for these conditions may also reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.

    A nutritious diet, physical activity, social engagement, sleep, and mentally stimulating pursuits have all been associated with helping people stay healthy as they age. These factors might also help reduce the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. Clinical trials are testing some of these possibilities.

    Early-life factors may also play a role. For example, studies have linked higher levels of education with a decreased risk of dementia. There are also differences in dementia risk among racial groups and sexesall of which are being studied to better understand the causes of Alzheimers disease and to develop effective treatments and preventions for all people.

    Symptoms Of Dementia With Lewy Bodies

    Diagnosing any type of dementia is difficult, but there are many cornerstone symptoms that help achieve an accurate diagnosis. In Lewy body dementia, the most prevalent symptoms include:

    • Disrupted sleep- often this is the first sign to look out for further symptoms in years to come. Affected individuals will physically act out dreams, moving while sleeping and sometimes hitting their partners in their sleep.
    • Difficulty with problem-solving abilities such as putting together a puzzle
    • Lowered inhibitions
    • Visual hallucinations and sensory disturbances
    • Tremors and Parkinsonism often occurs last in LBD, which includes loss of balance
    • Blood pressure can drop with LBD, causing fainting spells
    • Bladder issues and incontinence

    To diagnose someone with Lewy body dementia based on symptoms alone, at least two of these symptoms must be present, including dementia. New research has provided insight into brain scans to more accurately diagnose LBD and other brain disorders in a clinic.

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    Outlook For Dementia Patients

    The symptoms of dementia may progress based on the condition. If you think you or a loved one may be experiencing early symptoms of dementia, you should talk to your doctor right away.

    While there is no cure for Alzheimers and other conditions causing dementia, early diagnosis help patients receive all possible treatment options and manage symptoms for as long as possible.

    Four Common Types Of Dementia

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    The term dementia is an umbrella term used to describe the symptoms of cognitive impairment. And within the dementia umbrella, there are many different variations Alzheimers included. Most of us average folk dont realize that all dementia is not Alzheimers. In fact, I would venture to say that the regular layman isnt quite sure what the difference between Alzheimers and Dementia is. Dont fret Ill explain it here!

    Learning the difference between the varying levels of memory loss can be crucial to know the dos and donts of dealing with behavior challenges. It will also come into play with understanding the levels of care that are available to fit your loved ones needs, so they can live more comfortably.

    In this blog we will discuss the Top 4 most common types of Dementia. The good news for you is that at The Kensington, we are very experienced with these areas of Memory Care and more. We welcome everyone!

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    Frontotemporal Dementia With Parkinsonism

    One form of familial FTD, also known as frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism-17 , is caused by genetic changes in the gene for tau protein, located on chromosome 17. No other risk factors for this condition are known.

    FTDP-17 is rare and accounts for only three per cent of all cases of dementia. Symptoms progressively get worse over time and usually appear between the ages of 40 and 60. The condition affects both thinking and behavioural skills and movements such as rigidity, lack of facial expression and problems with balance .

    It can be distressing to be told that you have a genetic disorder or are at risk of having one. Genetic counselling provides the person and their family with information about a genetic disorder and its likely impact on their lives. This can assist a person with FTDP-17 to make informed medical and personal decisions about how to manage their condition and the challenges it presents to their health and wellbeing. Prenatal genetic counselling is also available for parents to help them decide about a pregnancy that may be at risk of FTDP-17.

    What Is Alzheimers Disease

    • Alzheimers disease is the most common type of dementia.
    • It is a progressive disease beginning with mild memory loss and possibly leading to loss of the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to the environment.
    • Alzheimers disease involves parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language.
    • It can seriously affect a persons ability to carry out daily activities.

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    Dementia With Lewy Bodies

    Dementia with Lewy bodies, also known as Lewy body dementia, is caused by protein deposits in nerve cells. This interrupts chemical messages in the brain and causes memory loss and disorientation.

    People with this type of dementia also experience visual hallucinations and have trouble falling asleep at night or fall asleep unexpectedly during the day. They also might faint or become lost or disoriented.

    Dementia with Lewy bodies shares many symptoms with Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. For example, many people develop trembling in their hands, have trouble walking, and feel weak.

    Symptoms Of Alzheimers Disease

    Defying dementia: It is not inevitable

    Alzheimers disease symptoms often mimic symptoms of everyday stress, and it can be easy to go for a long time without recognizing a larger issue. While losing a restful nights sleep can lead to symptoms including an impaired ability to focus, short- and long-term memory loss, and poor mood, these symptoms are also common signs of early stages of Alzheimers disease. Other symptoms of the condition include:

    • Inability to recall numerical sequences like phone numbers and addresses
    • Difficulty planning and solving problems
    • Trouble completing or remembering to do everyday tasks like self-care and chores
    • Forgetting material you just watched or read, as well as misplacing things often
    • Withdrawing from social situations and changes in personality

    Symptoms of early-onset Alzheimers disease differ only in that they appear between the ages of 30 and 65, whereas late-onset AD is diagnosed in people over age 65. While it may be very difficult to determine if you simply need more sleep or food, one way to recognize a larger memory problem is to note how affected your daily life is by the presence of these symptoms.

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    What Are The Stages Of Dementia

    The stages of dementia vary from person to person and the type of dementia. Keeping the four common types of dementia in mind, these seven stages are the usual progression that is experienced:

    • No symptoms yet, but tests might reveal a problem
    • Very mild changes in behavior, but independence remains
    • Mild decline is noticeable, including changes in thinking, forgetting events, and repeating statements
    • Moderate decline, meaning trouble remembering recent events and handling money
    • A moderate to severe decline where they forget names, are unsure what time of day it is, and need some assistance with basic daily tasks
    • Their decline is severe they are forgetting their spouses name, their personality is changing, and they need help eating and going to the bathroom
    • Very severe decline, where they are unable to walk, can no longer speak their thoughts, and spend most time in bed

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