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How To Not Get Alzheimer’s

You’re Not Buckling Up Or Wearing A Helmet

Difficult to remember? Mild memory loss? How not to get Alzheimer in old age

Keep your noggin as safe as you can. Certain types of head injuries may increase your risk of developing Alzheimer’s or dementia. Factors that may affect your risk include the severity of an injury you may have had and the age when you sustained it. If you injure your head in a car accident or take a spill from your bike without a helmet, it could increase your risk of Alzheimer’s years from now. Want to be “brain smart”? Buckle up every time you get in the car no matter how short the trip, and wear a helmet when biking.

The Rx: As we age, falls are an increasing risk. Check your home for places you may slip or trip. For instance, if you have an area rug, make sure it’s got floor-gripping padding underneath to keep it in place. Install easy-to-grab bars in your shower to help minimize risk.

Let Your Brain Breathe

The Alzheimers Association has found strong links between smoking and dementia. Smoking causes damage to your heart and blood vessels. Cigarette smoke can also cause swelling in your brain that is linked to dementia.

Action Strategy: Smoking can be a lifelong habit, which makes it very difficult to quit. There are many programs that can be helpful. Consider talking to your doctor or browsing the Smoke Free website. You might be surprised at the apps, programs and support available.

How Accurate Is It

This quiz is NOT a diagnostic tool. Mental health disorders can only be diagnosed by licensed healthcare professionals.

Psycom believes assessments can be a valuable first step toward getting treatment. All too often people stop short of seeking help out of fear their concerns arent legitimate or severe enough to warrant professional intervention.

If you think you or someone you care about may be suffering from dementia or any other mental health condition, PsyCom.net strongly recommends that you seek help from a mental health professional in order to receive a proper diagnosis and support. For those in crisis, we have compiled a list of resources where you may be able to find additional help at: https://www.psycom.net/get-help-mental-health.

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Choose The Right Food When Its Time To Eat

We dont have a pill for Alzheimers, Dr. Rahul said, but we do have the MIND diet. The MIND diet is an abbreviation for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, and it mainly focuses on having green-leafed vegetables and fruits every day. Vegetables and fruits have a lot of antioxidants and chemicals like vitamin E which has been proven to help cope with ageing.

Choosing plants, nuts, Berries is also part of the mind diet, and as dietitian Yu-Han Huang advised, it is a superfood that should be incorporated into your food at least twice per week for the best effect. Fatty fish, Dr. Rahul also emphasised, have Omega-3. And the Omega-3s in the fish slows cognitive decline and reduces oxidative stress in the brain.

Pillar #: Stress Management

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Chronic or persistent stress can take a heavy toll on the brain, leading to shrinkage in a key memory area, hampering nerve cell growth, and increasing the risk of Alzheimers disease and dementia. Yet simple stress management tools can minimize its harmful effects and protect your brain.

Breathe! Quiet your stress response with deep, abdominal breathing. Restorative breathing is powerful, simple, and free!

Schedule daily relaxation activities. Keeping stress under control requires regular effort. Learning relaxation techniques such as meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, or yoga can help you unwind and reverse the damaging effects of stress.

Nourish inner peace. Regular meditation, prayer, reflection, and religious practice may immunize you against the damaging effects of stress.

Make fun a priority. All work and no play is not good for your stress levels or your brain. Make time for leisure activities that bring you joy, whether it be stargazing, playing the piano, or working on your bike.

Keep your sense of humor. This includes the ability to laugh at yourself. The act of laughing helps your body fight stress.

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Genetic Testing For Alzheimer’s Disease

A blood test can identify which APOE alleles a person has, but results cannot predict who will or will not develop Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, APOE testing is used primarily in research settings to identify study participants who may have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s. This knowledge helps scientists look for early brain changes in participants and compare the effectiveness of possible treatments for people with different APOE profiles.

Genetic testing is also used by physicians to help diagnose early-onset Alzheimers disease and to test people with a strong family history of Alzheimers or a related brain disease.

Genetic testing for APOE or other genetic variants cannot determine an individuals likelihood of developing Alzheimers diseasejust which risk factor genes a person has. It is unlikely that genetic testing will ever be able to predict the disease with 100 percent accuracy, researchers believe, because too many other factors may influence its development and progression.

Some people learn their APOE status through consumer genetic testing or think about getting this kind of test. They may wish to consult a doctor or genetic counselor to better understand this type of test and their test results. General information about genetic testing can be found at:

Pillar #: Healthy Diet

In Alzheimers disease, inflammation and insulin resistance injure neurons and inhibit communication between brain cells. Alzheimers is sometimes described as diabetes of the brain, and a growing body of research suggests a strong link between metabolic disorders and the signal processing systems. By adjusting your eating habits, however, you can help reduce inflammation and protect your brain.

Manage your weight. Extra pounds are a risk factor for Alzheimers disease and other types of dementia. A major study found that people who were overweight in midlife were twice as likely to develop Alzheimers down the line, and those who were obese had three times the risk. Losing weight can go a long way to protecting your brain.

Cut down on sugar.Sugary foods and refined carbs such as white flour, white rice, and pasta can lead to dramatic spikes in blood sugar which inflame your brain. Watch out for hidden sugar in all kinds of packaged foods from cereals and bread to pasta sauce and low or no-fat products.

Enjoy a Mediterranean diet. Several epidemiological studies show that eating a Mediterranean diet dramatically reduces the risk of decline from cognitive impairment and Alzheimers disease. That means plenty of vegetables, beans, whole grains, fish and olive oiland limited processed food.

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Stage : Mild Cognitive Impairment

Clear cognitive problems begin to manifest in stage 3. A few signs of stage 3 dementia include:

  • Getting lost easily
  • Noticeably poor performance at work
  • Forgetting the names of family members and close friends
  • Difficulty retaining information read in a book or passage
  • Losing or misplacing important objects
  • Difficulty concentrating

Patients often start to experience mild to moderate anxiety as these symptoms increasingly interfere with day to day life. Patients who may be in this stage of dementia are encouraged to have a clinical interview with a clinician for proper diagnosis.

Tips For Starting And Sticking With An Exercise Plan

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If youve been inactive for a while, starting an exercise program can be intimidating. But remember: a little exercise is better than none. In fact, adding just modest amounts of physical activity to your weekly routine can have a profound effect on your health.

Choose activities you enjoy and start smalla 10-minute walk a few times a day, for exampleand allow yourself to gradually build up your momentum and self-confidence.

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Can Controlling High Blood Pressure Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Controlling high blood pressure is known to reduce a person’s risk for heart disease and stroke. The NASEM committee of experts concluded that managing blood pressure when it’s high, particularly for middle-aged adults, also might help prevent or delay Alzheimer’s dementia.

Many types of studies show a connection between high blood pressure, cerebrovascular disease , and dementia. For example, it’s common for people with Alzheimer’s-related changes in the brain to also have signs of vascular damage in the brain, autopsy studies show. In addition, observational studies have found that high blood pressure in middle age, along with other cerebrovascular risk factors such as diabetes and smoking, increase the risk of developing dementia.

Clinical trialsthe gold standard of medical proofare underway to determine whether managing high blood pressure in individuals with hypertension can prevent Alzheimer’s dementia or cognitive decline.

One large clinical trialcalled SPRINT-MIND found that lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120 mmHg, compared to a target of less than 140 mmHg, did not significantly reduce the risk of dementia. Participants were adults age 50 and older who were at high risk of cardiovascular disease but had no history of stroke or diabetes.

Stage : Very Mild Changes

You still might not notice anything amiss in your loved one’s behavior, but they may be picking up on small differences, things that even a doctor doesn’t catch. This could include forgetting words or misplacing objects.

At this stage, subtle symptoms of Alzheimer’s don’t interfere with their ability to work or live independently.

Keep in mind that these symptoms might not be Alzheimer’s at all, but simply normal changes from aging.

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How To Prevent Alzheimers

Strategies for preventing the onset of cognitive disease will vary with every individual but clinical research continues to indicate that healthy lifestyles can make our brains more resilient.

  • Physical exercise. The most convincing evidence is that physical exercise helps prevent the development of Alzheimers and can slow the progression in people who have symptoms, says Dr. Gad Marshall, associate medical director of clinical trials at the Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment. Thirty minutes of moderately vigorous aerobic exercise, three to four days per week is recommended. This doesnt have to involve jumping through hoops. Stick with the exercises that you enjoy, but build physical activity into your daily routine.
  • Take a brisk walk with a friend.
  • Consider a low-impact physical activity like swimming or riding a stationary bicycle.
  • A dance class is an especially good form of brain-healthy exercise. It is aerobic and also provides the mental challenge of remembering dance steps, hand-eye coordination and balance.
  • If you ride a bus, get off a couple of bus stops ahead of your usual stop and walk the distance.
  • Physical exercise. Many diets have been shown to slow the progression of Alzheimers.
  • Common sense dietary guidelines include staying away from processed meats, butter and heavy cream as all are laden with saturated fat. Too much sugar is also dangerous. Sugar is inflammatory and can also lead to unhealthy weight gain.
  • Maintain a regular sleep schedule
  • What Is Alzheimers Disease

    Forget me not colouring sheet
    • Alzheimers disease is the most common type of dementia.
    • It is a progressive disease beginning with mild memory loss and possibly leading to loss of the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to the environment.
    • Alzheimers disease involves parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language.
    • It can seriously affect a persons ability to carry out daily activities.

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    Ingredients Of The Mind Diet

    The MIND diet focuses on plant-based foods linked to dementia prevention. It encourages eating from 10 healthy food groups:

    • Leafy green vegetables, at least 6 servings/week
    • Other vegetables, at least 1 serving/day
    • Berries, at least 2 servings/week
    • Whole grains, at least 3 servings/day
    • Fish, 1 serving/week
    • Olive oil

    The MIND diet limits servings of red meat, sweets, cheese, butter/margarine and fast/fried food.

    *Be careful about how much alcohol you drink. How the body handles alcohol can change with age. Learn more about alcohol and older adults.

    Some, but not all, observational studies those in which individuals are observed or certain outcomes are measured, without treatment have shown that the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk for dementia. These studies compared cognitively normal people who ate a Mediterranean diet with those who ate a Western-style diet, which contains more red meat, saturated fats and sugar.

    Evidence supporting the MIND diet comes from observational studies of more than 900 dementia-free older adults, which found that closely following the MIND diet was associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimers disease and a slower rate of cognitive decline.

    Rapid And Unexplained Mood Swings And/or Depression

    This is different to: more typical age-related behaviours such as becoming irritable when a routine is disrupted.

    Mood and personality changes can be associated with early signs of dementia. This could include becoming confused, suspicious, depressed, fearful or anxious, and your parent may find themselves getting easily upset in places they feel unsure about. Some of the dementia symptoms NHS lists include:

    • Increased anxiety
    • Depression
    • Violent mood swings

    For example, your parent may appear calm, then visibly upset, and then very angry in a matter of minutes. This is a significant sign of dementia anger and frustration specifically if its unprovoked.

    Other physical signs include pacing, obsessing over minor details, agitation, fear, confusion, rage and feeling overwhelmed because theyre trying to make sense of a world thats now confusing to them.

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    What Is Known About Alzheimers Disease

    Scientists do not yet fully understand what causes Alzheimers disease. There likely is not a single cause but rather several factors that can affect each person differently.

    • Age is the best known risk factor for Alzheimers disease.
    • Family historyresearchers believe that genetics may play a role in developing Alzheimers disease. However, genes do not equal destiny. A healthy lifestyle may help reduce your risk of developing Alzheimers disease. Two large, long term studies indicate that adequate physical activity, a nutritious diet, limited alcohol consumption, and not smoking may help people. To learn more about the study, you can listen to a short podcast.
    • Changes in the brain can begin years before the first symptoms appear.
    • Researchers are studying whether education, diet, and environment play a role in developing Alzheimers disease.
    • There is growing scientific evidence that healthy behaviors, which have been shown to prevent cancer, diabetes, and heart disease, may also reduce risk for subjective cognitive decline. Heres 8 ways.

    Paranoia Delusion And Hallucinations

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    Distortions of reality, such as paranoia, delusions, and hallucinations, can be another result of the disease process in dementia. Not everyone with dementia develops these symptoms, but they can make dementia much more difficult to handle.

    Lewy body dementia, in particular, increases the likelihood of delusions and hallucinations, although they can occur in all types of dementia.

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    Keep Your Mind Active

    An active mind may help lower the risk of dementia, so keep challenging yourself. Some examples would be:

    • study something new, like a new language
    • do puzzles and play games
    • read challenging books
    • learn to read music, take up an instrument, or start writing
    • stay socially engaged: keep in touch with others or join group activities
    • volunteer

    What Do We Know About Individual Foods

    Many foods blueberries, leafy greens, and curcumin , to name a few have been studied for their potential cognitive benefit. These foods were thought to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant or other properties that might help protect the brain. So far, there is no evidence that eating or avoiding a specific food can prevent Alzheimers disease or age-related cognitive decline.

    But scientists continue to look for clues. One study, based on older adults reports of their eating habits, found that eating a daily serving of leafy green vegetables such as spinach and kale was associated with slower age-related cognitive decline, perhaps due to the neuroprotective effects of certain nutrients. Research has also shown that eating a diet that includes regular fish consumption is associated with higher cognitive function and slower cognitive decline with age. Another recent study, in mice, found that consuming a lot of salt increased levels of the protein tau, found in the brains of people with Alzheimers, and caused cognitive impairment.

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    What Kind Of Doctor Tests For Dementia

    A primary care doctor can perform a physical exam and find out more about your symptoms to determine what may be the cause. They will likely refer you to one or several specialists that can perform specific tests to diagnose dementia. Specialists may include neurologists, who specialize in the brain and nervous system psychiatrists or psychologists, who specialize in mental health, mental functions, and memory or geriatricians, who specialize in healthcare for older adults.

    The Seven Stages Of Dementia

    You Can " Catch"  Alzheimer

    One of the most difficult things to hear about dementia is that, in most cases, dementia is irreversible and incurable. However, with an early diagnosis and proper care, the progression of some forms of dementia can be managed and slowed down. The cognitive decline that accompanies dementia conditions does not happen all at once – the progression of dementia can be divided into seven distinct, identifiable stages.

    Learning about the stages of dementia can help with identifying signs and symptoms early on, as well as assisting sufferers and caretakers in knowing what to expect in further stages. The earlier dementia is diagnosed, the sooner treatment can start.

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    Early Signs Of Dementia Checklist

    Signs of early onset dementia usually affect people in their 50s and early 60s. But is it really a dementia sign or is it just a something we do as we get older?

    Signs of Dementia/Alzheimers:
    Making a bad decision once in a while
    Inability to manage a budgetMissing a monthly payment
    Losing track of the date or the seasonForgetting what day it is and remembering later
    Difficulty having a conversationSometimes forgetting which word to use
    Misplacing things and being unable to retrace steps to find themLosing things from time to time

    As dementia is a progressive neurological disorder, there are many stages and dementia symptoms. The changes are gradual, and this may give your parent time to receive an early diagnosis and to slow down or prevent the disease from progressing.

    Fortunately, the first signs of dementia can be spotted before the symptoms make a big impact on day-to-day living and overall quality of life. For more information on the various stages of dementia, download our free and comprehensive dementia guide.

    Sometimes dementia diagnosis can be difficult as there is no one simple test to carry out and early symptoms can be similar to the age-related changes listed above. Here are 10 early signs of Dementia to look out for.

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