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What Do Dementia Patients Die Of

How Can You Recognise When A Person Is Dying

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Recognising when a person with advanced dementia is dying may not always be easy as they may have many general signs and symptoms of dying already. For example, some common signs and symptoms seen in people dying are:

  • profound weakness
  • needing assistance with all care
  • disorientation to time or place
  • agitated or restless
  • difficulty concentrating.

People with advanced dementia may show some of these signs and symptoms for months or even years making it hard to tell if the person is approaching death. However, if these symptoms become much worse over a period of two to three weeks, or even days or hours, it is important that a doctor or nurse sees the person. If the doctor or nurse thinks that the person is deteriorating or nearing the end of life and it would be in the persons best interest to be cared for in their own home, a care home or hospice then discuss this information with the persons family. They should also be given an explanation of why the deterioration is happening and the care that is going to be given. When death is expected it is usally not of benefit for the purpose with dementia to be sent to hospital: the death is more likely to be traumatic, unsupported and complicated by other medical events .

When the dying process is established, the person may experience further changes:

  • losing consciousness
  • no longer able to swallow
  • terminal restlessness
  • changes to breathing pattern and circulation .

Dementia & Alzheimer’s Disease

Because dementia is an incurable disease, there is one pertinent question that many ask and that is how do dementia patients die?

Before answering this question it is important to note that in many countries Alzheimers disease and other kinds of dementia have been documented as the leading cause of death in the country, especially for the older generation.

According to Alzheimers Research UK, deaths due to dementia doubled from 40,253 in 2007 to 87, 199 in 2017 and the trend does not appear to change anytime soon.

In America, dementia is the 6th leading cause of death and currently, millions of people are living with the disease.

World Health Organization estimates that the number of dementia deaths across the globe will increase by more than 40% from 2015 to 2030.

How Quickly Does Parkinsons Progress

Parkinsons disease is slowly progressive, and each case may be different. People may have symptoms for a year or two before a doctor makes a diagnosis.

The longer the symptoms are present, the easier it is to predict how a person with Parkinsons disease will do. In those with tremors and symptoms on one side of the body, the disease typically advances more slowly than in those without tremors who have symptoms that affect both sides of the body.

While the life expectancy of these patients reduces, people with Parkinsons disease usually function quite well for many years. However, these patients are at risk of suffering dementia, or from developing instability that could lead to falls.

This condition is by far the most treatable of all neurodegenerative disorders. A doctor may indicate treatment to help control symptoms.

For example, there are cases where people can function better in their daily lives five years later after they start medication.

The treatment includes exercise and changes in lifestyle. As well as medication with carbidopa-levodopa or dopamine agonists to improve body functionality.

There are surgical options as well, like deep brain stimulation, surgeons implant electrodes in the brain, and they receive electrical pulses, which reduces symptoms.

However, symptoms and responses to treatment vary from person to person, so it is not possible to accurately predict how Parkinsons disease will progress.

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Consider Palliative Care And Hospice As Part Of The Process

Palliative care addresses the overall well-being of people with chronic illnesses like progressive brain disorders and dementia. Palliative care and end-of-life hospice care are not the same thing.

  • Palliative care. Palliative care providers can help you work through important decisions about which treatments and procedures will bring the biggest benefits. They can also provide medications to relieve pain, anxiety, emotional distress, and other symptoms that arise in late stage dementia. They may be able to help you access the services of social workers, nutritionists, and therapists to meet a wide range of needs.
  • Hospice care. Hospice services can ease the transition to end-of-life care, supplying equipment and treatments that bring greater comfort and make it easier to care for a person in this stage.

Care In The Last Days Of Life With Dementia

How do Dementia Patients Die?

We use the words dying or terminal to describe when a person is in the last few days or hours of life. Sometimes a death is sudden and unexpected. More often, though, a person shows signs that they are dying: it is important to recognise these and plan ahead. This section will help you to anticipate and manage symptoms, as well as provide some tips to help prepare family and loved ones through what is a highly emotional and uncertain time.

I dont want my mother to die alone. I want her to be comfortable and to die with dignity.

A daughter of a person with dementia.

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Watch Our Talk The Last Stage Of Alzheimers: What You Need To Know With Jasja Kotterman And Dr Liz Sampson Of University College London:

And then one day, the spell broke. She was hungry and thirsty, and drank and even ate and chewed, slowly, but with relish. And we gave her as much as we dared without causing her to choke. The doctor told us we would have many more months with her if she kept eating. It was a relief to hear this, and we had a few good daysso good that I planned to go back home, my sister made plans to head back to work, and my father planned to visit friends in France. We would keep in touch and be ready to come back as soon as things got worse again.

But worse came the following day. The doctor called saying my mother had developed a lung infection. She must have choked on something on one of the good days, some water, some food had entered her lungs and triggered a lung infection.

Medical Interventions In Late

If someone is in the later stages of dementia and becomes seriously ill, there may be discussion about whether to actively treat their illness. Ways of intervening may include resuscitation after a heart attack, antibiotic treatment for pneumonia, or giving food or liquids by mouth.

Giving or withholding treatment is a serious decision to make for someone else and is not an easy one to make. You need to consider:

Sometimes the decision can only be made by a guardian appointed by a tribunal or court. Each state and territory has different regulations but medical staff or Dementia Australia can advise you about appropriate contacts.

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Do Treatments Add Time To Life Expectancy

Experts simply dont know whether treatments help a person live longer with Alzheimers disease. AD and other similar dementias progress no matter what. Treatments like medications and therapies have been conclusively shown to help manage symptoms, meaning they make it easier to live with the disease, but they do not reverse symptoms. The memory of a person with dementia who takes medications like cholinesterase inhibitors, for example, will be slightly better than the memory of someone who is not on medication. Quality of life therefore improves with treatment. This means better years with dementia, but probably not more years.

Alma And Silvias Story

The DYING Process in Dementia: How to know that death is close

Alma had been forgetful for years, but even after her family knew that Alzheimers disease was the cause of her forgetfulness, they never talked about what the future would bring. As time passed and the disease eroded Almas memory and ability to think and speak, she became less and less able to share her concerns and wishes with those close to her.

This made it hard for her daughter Silvia to know what Alma needed or wanted. When the doctors asked about feeding tubes or antibiotics to treat pneumonia, Silvia didnt know how to best reflect her mothers wishes. Her decisions had to be based on what she knew about her moms values, rather than on what Alma actually said she wanted.

Quality of life is an important issue when making healthcare decisions for people with dementia. For example, medicines are available that may delay or keep symptoms from becoming worse for a little while. Medicines also may help control some behavioral symptoms in people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimers disease.

However, some caregivers might not want drugs prescribed for people in the later stages of Alzheimers. They may believe that the persons quality of life is already so poor that the medicine is unlikely to make a difference. If the drug has serious side effects, they may be even more likely to decide against it.

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Implications For Policy And Practice

This study raises interesting issues in relation to EOLC for people with dementia which have implications for care provision and health and social care policy.Maintaining care at home until the end of life may often not be possible due to the long duration of the behavioural and dependency care needs associated with advanced dementia. While transfer to a care home setting may have adverse impact on longevity, adequate provision of appropriate long-term care facilities with staff skilled in the care of people with dementia could help optimise quality of EOLC and reduce undesired deaths in hospital. Such decisions might need to take into account not only health economic considerations but also patient and carer satisfaction with care and place of death. As people with dementia move towards the end of their lives, arguably, the focus may have to shift from hospitalisation, invasive medical treatments and harmful psychotropic drugs to the provision of a place of care, comfort and dignity.

  • Despite evidence that moving into a care home setting is associated with reduced longevity and the difficulties of a hospital admission for a patient with dementia, it appears to be the case with the relatively limited data that the most common place of final days of life and place of death for a person with dementia is either care home or hospital.

  • identify patient preferences

  • define goals of care and

  • implement a management plan consistent with those goals.

  • Should A Person With Dementia Live At Home

    Some people with dementia will have to live at home and find support services at times as there are risks involved. Some will need accommodations that keep their safety and quality of life a priority. In choosing whether a person can live alone, it is important to consider the amount of support they have available.

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    What Are The Symptoms

    Each person is unique and will experience dementia in their own way. The different types of dementia tend to affect people differently, especially in the early stages.

    A person with dementia will often have cognitive symptoms . They will often have problems with some of the following:

    • Day-to-day memory difficulty recalling events that happened recently.
    • Repetition repeating the same question or conversation frequently in a short space of time.
    • Concentrating, planning or organising difficulties making decisions, solving problems or carrying out a sequence of tasks .
    • Language difficulties following a conversation or finding the right word for something.
    • Visuospatial skills – problems judging distances and seeing objects in three dimensions.
    • Orientation – losing track of the day or date, or becoming confused about where they are.

    Some people have other symptoms including movement problems, hallucinations or behaviour changes.

    Causes Of Vascular Dementia

    Why Do Dementia Patients Stop Eating?

    Vascular dementia is caused by reduced blood flow to the brain, which damages and eventually kills brain cells.

    This can happen as a result of:

    • narrowing and blockage of the small blood vessels inside the brain
    • a single stroke, where the blood supply to part of the brain is suddenly cut off
    • lots of “mini strokes” that cause tiny but widespread damage to the brain

    In many cases, these problems are linked to underlying conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, and lifestyle factors, such as smoking and being overweight.

    Tackling these might reduce your risk of vascular dementia in later life, although it’s not yet clear exactly how much your risk of dementia can be reduced.

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    Common Complications Of Alzheimers Disease That Cause Death

    A lack of self-awareness and self-care, prolonged confinement to a bed, feeding failure, inability to receive proper nutrition and dehydration are all factors in the development of other life-threatening health conditions in dementia patients. While brain damage associated with AD is the driving force behind the patients cognitive decline and incapacitation, these secondary illnesses and conditions are ultimately responsible for causing the patients physical decline and death.

    Complications of Alzheimers disease are commonly cited as such on death certificates. Because of this, deaths with a primary cause of AD and related dementias are seriously underreported. This is especially true since dementia can go unnoticed as it progresses slowly over the course of many years. Furthermore, a significant number of patients never receive an official neurological diagnosis while alive or after they have died.

    Tests For Vascular Dementia

    There’s no single test for vascular dementia.

    The tests that are needed to make a diagnosis include:

    • an assessment of symptoms for example, whether these are typical symptoms of vascular dementia
    • a full medical history, including asking about a history of conditions related to vascular dementia, such as strokes or high blood pressure
    • an assessment of mental abilities this will usually involve several tasks and questions
    • a brain scan, such as an MRI scan or CT scan, to look for any changes that have happened in your brain

    Find out more about the tests used to diagnose dementia.

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    Can You Die From Dementia And How Does It Kill You

    Many people worry about developing dementia one day. However, experts say there are things you can do to by more than 30 percent. In this article, we’ll cover some of the easy lifestyle changes you can make to improve your odds of staying healthy.

    If you have dementia, you may be wondering what it might mean for your long-term health. Know that it’s not the type of disorder that can shorten your life expectancy, but it may make you more susceptible to contracting certain illnesses. We’ll talk about that in more detail later on, and we’ll share some suggestions to ease your fears and worries.

    What Will Cause Death?

    For many, dementia is unfathomable. It’s scary to think about losing memories and the ability to function normally. If you have been diagnosed with dementia, know someone who has, or are just curious about the subject, you may wonder how a person with dementia dies.

    It’s possible that you could die from complications of dementia, but you’re unlikely to die from the disease itself. For example, dementia could damage your brain over time to the point that you lose the ability to breathe and therefore die. However, for many patients, this is not the case.

    Even though there are around 50 million people worldwide who have dementia, you’re not destined to get it. There are billions of people who don’t have it and who will never get it.

    Are There Any Treatments

    Death and dying in dementia

    There are treatments that can help with the symptoms of some forms of dementia for a period of time, but there are currently no treatments that slow, halt or reverse the changes in the brain caused by the diseases. There are currently no treatments specifically for vascular dementia or frontotemporal dementia.

    In the case of vascular dementia, a doctor may prescribe medication to treat underlying cardiovascular risk factors like high blood pressure or diabetes. Physiotherapy, speech therapy or occupational therapy may be offered to help with speech or movement problems. Non-drug treatments such as cognitive therapies may be available and can help some people with dementia to manage their symptoms.

    Alzheimer’s Society has more information on treatments for dementia.

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    Signs Of Death In Elderly With Dementia: End Stage

    Dementia is a term used to describe the persistent or chronic decline in ones mental processes and this include personality changes, impaired reasoning, and memory loss. The most common form is Alzheimers disease and it accounts for over 70 percent of all the dementia cases.

    It is one of the greatest causes of death in the United States with over five million people living with the disease in the country alone. One of the age groups affected by dementia is the seniors. If you are a caregiver, it is important to know the signs of death in elderly with dementia.

    Most progressive dementias and Alzheimers disease do not have any cure. The diseases get worse with the passage of time, but the timeline can be very different from one person to the next.

    Caring for persons with the diseases can be stressful and very challenging, especially when their personality begins to change and their cognitive function starts to decline. It is possible that the individual will not even recognize the people who are closest and dearest to them.

    As the disease progresses, the person needs more and more support from the caregiver and the family. If the person is elderly, the caregiver needs to know about all the signs that the patient may be dying.

    You may need to put the patient on hospice so as that he or she can get the appropriate care during such moments. This offers the family and the patient spiritual, physical, and emotional care.

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