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What To Expect With Dementia Patients

Dementia Causes Loss Of Cognitive And Behavioral Function

What to Expect with Late Stage Dementia Symptoms (My Experience)

Dementia is the term used to describe the loss of both cognitive and behavioral functions, typically in the elderly. It can impact not just the ability to remember, reason, and think, but also things like problem-solving capability, visual perception, ability to manage ones own life, and even behavior and personality due to lack of control on emotions. While some amount of nerve loss in the brain is normal as one grows older, if you have dementia this happens at a far greater rate and to a greater extent.2

Be A Realistic Caregiver

Be realistic about what constitutes success during the;progression of the disease. Success is helping to assure that the person you are caring for is as comfortable, happy and safe as possible. Most experienced dementia caregivers will tell you that the person they care for has good days and bad days. Try your best to foster the good days and even the good moments for the person with dementia, dont try to force them. Also, be realistic about the course of the disease. Remember that most types of dementia, including Alzheimers, are irreversible and progressive. Dementia will tend to get worse over time and there is no known cure.

Knowing The Stages Of Dementia Helps You Plan

Even if the stages arent exact and symptoms can still be unpredictable, being able to plan ahead is essential.

The truth is that Alzheimers and dementia care is expensive and time-consuming. Being financially prepared for increasing care needs is a necessity.

On an emotional level, having an idea of what symptoms to expect helps you find ways to cope with challenging behaviors.;

It also gives you a chance to mentally prepare yourself for the inevitable changes in your older adult.

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Making Decisions About Your Future

You may want to plan ahead for a time when it becomes harder for you to make decisions, or when you might not be able to make your own decisions.

Your care plan can cover the care you would like in the later stages of dementia. You can arrange for someone like a family member or friend to make decisions for you if that is needed. This is called a lasting power of attorney.

You can also make a general statement about your wishes for the future. This is called an advance statement. You can ask your care coordinator or your local council for more information about setting up a lasting power of attorney or making an advance statement.

Stage : Severe Decline

Pin on dementia

As Alzheimer’s progresses, your loved one might recognize faces but forget names. They might also mistake a person for someone else, for instance, think their wife is their mother. Delusions might set in, such as thinking they need to go to work even though they no longer have a job.

You might need to help them go to the bathroom.

It might be hard to talk, but you can still connect with them through the senses. Many people with Alzheimer’s love hearing music, being read to, or looking over old photos.

At this stage, your loved one might struggle to:

  • Feed themselves

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What Are The Seven Stages Of Dementia

  • What Are the Seven Stages of Dementia? Center
  • Dementia is a general term used for progressive mental or cognitive decline that has affected 47 million people globally; by 2050, this number is expected to increase to an estimated 131 million people.

    Out of the various diseases that have dementia as one of their characteristics, Alzheimers disease is the most common. The progression of dementia has been divided into seven stages as per the Global Deterioration Scale of primary degenerative dementia prepared by Dr. Riesberg and his team.

    Stage 1

    The imaging techniques such as computed tomography scan of the brain might show some changes but the patient does not exhibit any of the cognitive signs and symptoms.;

    Stage 2

    • The patient starts forgetting words or misplacing objects; this may go unnoticed by people around them.;
    • It should be remembered that this stage might also occur due to the normal aging process.

    Stage 3

    • The patient suffers from short-term memory lossforgetting what they just read and the names of new acquaintances.;
    • They cant make plans or organize things as earlier.
    • They might frequently start misplacing and losing things.

    Stage 4

    Stage 5

    • The patient experiences major memory disturbances such as forgetting their phone number and address.;
    • They may forget how to bath and face trouble while choosing and wearing clothes.

    Stage 6 :;

    Stage 7 :;

    Stage : Moderately Severe Dementia

    When the patient begins to forget the names of their children, spouse, or primary caregivers, they are most likely entering stage 6 of dementia and will need full time care. In the sixth stage, patients are generally unaware of their surroundings, cannot recall recent events, and have skewed memories of their personal past. Caregivers and loved ones should watch for:

    • Delusional behavior

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    After Diagnosis Of Dementia: What To Expect From Health And Care Services

    This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0 except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: .

    Where we have identified any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders concerned.

    This publication is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/after-a-diagnosis-of-dementia-what-to-expect-from-health-and-care-services/after-diagnosis-of-dementia-what-to-expect-from-health-and-care-services

    Towards The End Of Life

    Dementia Diagnosis – Why It’s Important, What to Expect

    It can be very difficult for family and carers to prepare for the end, but by thinking about it and making some plans, it may be a little easier. When someone reaches the final stages of life one of the main concerns is to ensure that they are comfortable and as pain free as possible. If you are concerned that the person with dementia may be in some pain or discomfort, discuss this with the doctor and nursing staff.;

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    What Are The Symptoms

    Each person is unique and will experience dementia in their own way. The different types of dementia tend to affect people differently, especially in the early stages.

    A person with dementia will often have cognitive symptoms . They will often have problems with some of the following:

    • Day-to-day;memory; difficulty recalling events that happened recently.
    • Repetition; repeating the same question or conversation frequently in; a short space of time.
    • Concentrating, planning or organising; difficulties making decisions, solving problems or carrying out a sequence of tasks .
    • Language; difficulties following a conversation or finding the right word for something.
    • Visuospatial skills – problems judging distances and seeing objects in three dimensions.
    • Orientation – losing track of the day or date, or becoming confused about where they are.

    Some people have other symptoms including movement problems, hallucinations or behaviour changes.

    Third Dementia Stage: Mild Decline

    Family and friends may start noticing some cognitive and memory problems from the patient at the third dementia stage. Performance on both cognitive and memory tests is affected, and physicians can instantly identify impaired cognitive function. Senior citizens at third stage of dementia showcase some symptoms that may include:

    • Trouble remembering names of people they meet
    • Organizing and planning
    • Asking the same question repeatedly
    • Losing personal possessions which might include valuables

    It is possible that affected adults can begin to experience mild or moderate anxiety during the third stage of dementia, primarily because of the symptoms getting in the way of their everyday life. Should one notice any of the symptoms, it is imperative that the affected individuals go through a clinical interview with a licensed clinician to receive the proper diagnosis. It helps to start an appropriate medical course of action.

    Caregivers should also note that it is essential that they try and get rid of any stress that may be affecting the patient. Let them understand what is going on in a kind and loving manner so that they can prepare to embrace the journey ahead. They can also help the patients with memory in some ways such as reminding them to pay their bills and getting them to any appointments they may have on time.

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    Late Stages Of Alzheimers Disease Symptoms

    The needs of the person with Alzheimers become much more demanding as the disease progresses. In the late stages of Alzheimers, the person with the disease loses the ability to respond appropriately and is unable to converse with others. They will also develop an inability to control movements like sitting, standing and walking.

    Here are some other common symptoms of the disease that can occur:

    • Catches colds and infections easily
    • Day/night reversal of sleep pattern
    • Difficulty communicating
    • Difficulty using the toilet independently
    • Eventually requires help with activities of daily living, 24 hours per day
    • Eventually unable to walk
    • Hoarding, rummaging
    • Inability to sit and eventually to swallow
    • Incontinence
    • Loss of awareness of surroundings
    • Needs help walking
    • Needs progressively more help with personal care
    • Personality changes such as aggression, anxiety, hostility,;irritability or uncooperativeness
    • Repetitive questioning
    • Sundowners
    • Verbally aggressive or demanding behavior
    • Wandering

    Dying From Dementia With Late

    What to Expect as a Caregiver for Someone with Dementia ...

    The death of your loved one can be a hard concept to wrap your head around and accept. But knowing what to expect can help you when your loved one has late-stage dementia. It might help to know what will happen in the future so that you can be prepared emotionally and logistically.

    This article discusses how dementia progresses and what to expect during late-stage dementia.

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    The Alzheimers And Dementia Care Journey

    Caring for someone with Alzheimers disease or another type of dementia can be a long, stressful, and intensely emotional journey. But youre not alone. In the United States, there are more than 16 million people caring for someone with dementia, and many millions more around the world. As there is currently no cure for Alzheimers or dementia, it is often your caregiving and support that makes the biggest difference to your loved ones quality of life. That is a remarkable gift.

    However, caregiving can also become all-consuming. As your loved ones cognitive, physical, and functional abilities gradually diminish over time, its easy to become overwhelmed, disheartened, and neglect your own health and well-being. The burden of caregiving can put you at increased risk for significant health problems and many dementia caregivers experience depression, high levels of stress, or even burnout. And nearly all Alzheimers or dementia caregivers at some time experience sadness, anxiety, loneliness, and exhaustion. Seeking help and support along the way is not a luxury; its a necessity.

    Just as each individual with Alzheimers disease or dementia progresses differently, so too can the caregiving experience vary widely from person to person. However, there are strategies that can aid you as a caregiver and help make your caregiving journey as rewarding as it is challenging.

    Symptoms Specific To Vascular Dementia

    Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of dementia, after Alzheimer’s. Some people have both vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, often called “mixed dementia”.

    Symptoms of vascular dementia are similar to Alzheimer’s disease, although memory loss may not be as;obvious in the early stages.

    Symptoms can sometimes develop suddenly and quickly get worse,;but they can also develop gradually over many months or years.

    Specific symptoms can include:

    • stroke-like symptoms: including muscle weakness or temporary paralysis on one side of the body
    • movement problems; difficulty walking or a change in the way a person walks
    • thinking problems; having difficulty with attention, planning and reasoning
    • mood changes; depression and a tendency to become more emotional

    Read more about vascular dementia.

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    What Support Is Available For Me If I Care For Someone With Dementia

    When youre caring for someone else, its easy to overlook your own needs. But looking after your health and making time for yourself can help you feel better and cope better with your caring role.

    Caring for someone with dementia may lead to feelings of guilt, sadness, confusion or anger. Unlike with other conditions, it can be difficult to share these feelings with someone with dementia, leaving you feeling very isolated.

    Its important to acknowledge these feelings, and theres no right or wrong way to feel. If youre feeling anxious, depressed or struggling to cope stressed, talk to your doctor who can let you know about help and support available to you.

    What You Can Do For Your Loved One

    How to Handle Dementia Hallucinations & What to Expect

    As an individual with dementia declines, you can help them by providing a loving and supportive presence. Sit with them. Hold their hand. Play music they enjoy.

    One of the greatest gifts you can give your loved one is helping to get their affairs in order. Ensure that financial and healthcare powers of attorney are put in place, so you can make decisions when your loved one is no longer able. Look into funeral arrangements before you need them, so you dont need to make important decisions in a time of crisis.

    Talk to your loved ones physician about the possibility of palliative care support in the home and hospice care when your loved one is ready.

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    Symptoms In The Later Stages Of Dementia

    As dementia progresses, memory loss and difficulties with communication often become severe. In the later stages, the person is likely to neglect their own health, and require constant care and attention.

    The most common symptoms of advanced dementia include:

    • memory problems people may not recognise close family and friends, or remember where they live or where they are
    • communication problems; some people may eventually lose the ability to speak altogether. Using non-verbal means of communication, such as facial expressions, touch and gestures, can help
    • mobility problems many people become less able to move about unaided. Some may eventually become unable to walk and require a wheelchair or be confined to bed
    • behavioural problems; a significant;number of people will develop what are;known as “behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia”. These;may include increased agitation, depressive symptoms, anxiety, wandering, aggression, or sometimes hallucinations
    • bladder incontinence is common in the later stages of dementia, and some people will also experience bowel incontinence
    • appetite and weight loss problems;are both;common in advanced dementia. Many;people have;trouble eating or swallowing, and this can lead to choking, chest infections and other problems. Alzheimer’s Society has a useful factsheet on eating and drinking

    What To Expect In The Late Stages Of Alzheimers Disease

  • /
  • What To Expect In The Late Stages Of Alzheimers Disease

  • As Alzheimers advances into the later stages, caregivers and family members can expect quite a few new symptoms of the disease. Fortunately, being prepared now can help people better cope with the challenges of the late stages of Alzheimers.

    Although the disease doesnt affect every person the same way, informed caregivers can often reduce later stage crisis. Read our list of the symptoms to expect in the late stages of Alzheimers to better prepare for tomorrow, today.

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    The Seven Stages Of Dementia

    One of the most difficult things to hear about dementia is that, in most cases, dementia is irreversible and incurable. However, with an early diagnosis and proper care, the progression of some forms of dementia can be managed and slowed down. The cognitive decline that accompanies dementia conditions does not happen all at once – the progression of dementia can be divided into seven distinct, identifiable stages.

    Learning about the stages of dementia can help with identifying signs and symptoms early on, as well as assisting sufferers and caretakers in knowing what to expect in further stages. The earlier dementia is diagnosed, the sooner treatment can start.

    Stage : Moderate Dementia

    What You Need to Know About the Stages of Dementia

    Patients in stage 5 need some assistance in order to carry out their daily lives. The main sign for stage 5 dementia is the inability to remember major details such as the name of a close family member or a home address. Patients may become disoriented about the time and place, have trouble making decisions, and forget basic information about themselves, such as a telephone number or address.

    While moderate dementia can interfere with basic functioning, patients at this stage do not need assistance with basic functions such as using the bathroom or eating. Patients also still have the ability to remember their own names and generally the names of spouses and children.

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    Dont Forget To Care For Yourself Too

    Joining a carers group can be a good way for you to find people who truly relate to the situation you are in. It is a good place to share and talk it out or learn coping mechanisms others use to care for those with dementia. Social services or a dementia adviser or counselor can direct you to a local group. Alternatively, there are plenty of online support groups you could consider joining.17

    When you are close to someone with dementia you may find yourself asking why me. You may also get upset, angry, or frustrated, and possibly even feel guilty about thinking this way. At times, you may feel you are losing the love or affection you have for that person as these emotions take control. On the flip side, you may also feel guilty for taking time out to do something for yourself, or about losing your temper at them or not being kind enough. Dont beat yourself up about it. This is as hard on you as it is on the person you love who has dementia. And you need downtime too. Some of these things could help:18

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