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How Early Can Alzheimer’s Begin

Struggling To Adapt To Change

Can Alzheimer’s Start In Your 20s?

For someone in the early stages of dementia, the experience can cause fear. Suddenly, they cant remember people they know or follow what others are saying. They cant remember why they went to the store, and they get lost on the way home.

Because of this, they might crave routine and be afraid to try new experiences. Difficulty adapting to change is also a typical symptom of early dementia.

What Is Early Onset Alzheimers

Early onset Alzheimers is a rare form of Alzheimers. As mentioned earlier, it can strike people in their 30s and 40s.

The sad thing is experts still dont have the full picture why younger people get early onset AD. But they know that family history is a factor.

There are three genes linked to early onset Alzheimers the APP, PSEN 1 and PSEN 2. Mutation in any of these genes can predispose you to develop Alzheimers before you turn 65.

If you want to know if youre at risk for developing early onset Alzheimers, you can go for genetic testing. Should you test positive, you can prepare for it and you could also take part in a research study.

Helping researchers learn more about this condition can help develop new treatments. And this could help other patients who suffer from the condition.

You Cant Remember That Restaurants Name

If you constantly forget what you had for breakfast, or cant recall the name of that restaurant you just went to, consider it a red flag. The most common sign is memory problems that interfere with your daily life, Dr. Fillit says. You may have trouble remembering familiar names or places on a regular basis.

It may not seem like a big deal. But if you find yourself struggling to remember details like these, or if this has become a frustrating problem, point it out to a doctor so they can monitor the situation.

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You Struggle To Recall What You Just Read

Most dementia symptoms will have an affect on your memory, in some way, shape, or form. So it makes sense it can impact your ability to read â and remember what you just read â as well.

As Zerling says, many people with early-onset dementia find that they need to start taking notes while theyre reading, in order to remember whats going on in the story.

Taking notes, of course, can be a good way to keep track or information, especially if youre studying. And thus it isnt a surefire sign of dementia. But if your note-taking is due to a newly developed memory problem, it may a symptom worth looking into.

Forgetfulness And Memory Loss

Early Dementia Signs and Medicaid Planning

While forgetting where you placed your car keys may commonly occur with anyone at any age, and perhaps a bit more as you age, persistent forgetfulness or lapses in memory is typically a sign that something is wrong. For people with early onset Alzheimers, they may begin noticing abnormal and chronic lapses in memory as early as their 30s or 40s.

If youre missing where you are and how you got there, struggling to find the right words when conversing or consistently forgetting what your partner asked you to do, yet you feel as if youre too young to be experiencing these things, you may be developing some signs of early memory decline.

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Symptoms Specific To Dementia With Lewy Bodies

Dementia with Lewy bodies has many of the symptoms of Alzheimers disease, and people with the condition typically also experience:

  • periods of being alert or drowsy, or fluctuating levels of confusion
  • visual hallucinations
  • becoming slower in their physical movements
  • repeated falls and fainting

Read more about dementia with Lewy bodies.

Frequently Asked Questions About Dementia

  • What are the early signs and symptoms of dementia and Alzheimer’s?Some of the most common early signs of dementia and Alzheimer’s symptoms include trouble remembering recent events, difficulty concentrating, increased mental confusion, changes in behavior or personality, apathy or withdrawal, and depression or anxiety. While these first signs of dementia may seem somewhat unassuming it is important to notice when these symptoms are occurring on a regular basis.
  • Is short-term memory loss a sign of dementia?Changes in memory is a normal sign of aging, but significant memory loss may be a sign of dementia. Additionally, having trouble remembering recently learned information can be an early warning sign of dementia.
  • What is the life expectancy of someone with dementia?Life expectancy depends largely on the patient’s age and health, and can range anywhere from 1 to 26 years, according to one study. Every case is different, and it depends on the type of dementia the patient has. The general life expectancy for an Alzheimer’s patient is 8 to 12 years from the date of diagnosis. Patients diagnosed around the age of 60 tend to decline more slowly than those diagnosed over the age of 80.
  • Can dementia be cured?There is no curative treatment for dementia currently available and no vaccination to prevent it. Medication is available to help relieve symptoms, and certain lifestyle changes may slow the progression of the disease.
  • Read Also: Is Senility The Same As Dementia

    Where To Get Help

    • Your local community health centre
    • National Dementia Helpline Dementia Australia Tel. 1800 100 500
    • Aged Care Assessment Services Tel. 1300 135 090
    • My Aged Care 1800 200 422
    • Cognitive Dementia and Memory Service clinics Tel. 1300 135 090
    • Carers Victoria Tel. 1800 242 636
    • Commonwealth Carelink and Respite Centres Australian Government Tel. 1800 052 222
    • Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service Tel. 1800 699 799 for 24-hour telephone advice for carers and care workers

    What Are The Causes Of Young

    early onset dementia

    The causes of young-onset dementia are similar to the diseases that usually cause dementia in older people. However, some causes, such as frontotemporal dementia , are more common in younger people. Dementia in younger people often has different symptoms, even when its caused by the same diseases as in older people.There is more information about some common causes of dementia, and how they can affect younger people, below.

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    Finding A Huge Gap In Services And Supports For Younger People

    âI unfortunately ran into that brick wall where I was ineligible for just about everything because of my age.â â Faye.

    Most social programs and services are designed for older people with dementia. In comparison, the number of programs designed for people living with young onset dementia is sparse.

    People living with young onset dementia may not find the programs intended for older adults interesting or beneficial in respect to their needs. They may not feel comfortable in a seniorsâ program. And even if they were interested and comfortable in joining a program, they might be ineligible because of their age!

    We have a gap in our knowledge about young onset dementia. As a result, there simply aren’t enough information, support, financial aid and services adapted for younger people living with dementia.

    However, this is changing. The Young Onset Gap Analysis Project, initiated through the National Information Support and Education Committee and the Alzheimer Society of Canada , explored the gaps of available learning and support resources for people living with young onset dementia, and sought advice and feedback from those with lived experience.

    The information from this report is being used to develop new resources dedicated to education and support for people living with young onset dementia, families, caregivers and healthcare providers.

    Treatment For Moderate To Severe Alzheimers

    A medication known as memantine, an N-methyl D-aspartate antagonist, is prescribed to treat moderate to severe Alzheimers disease. This drugs main effect is to decrease symptoms, which could enable some people to maintain certain daily functions a little longer than they would without the medication. For example, memantine may help a person in the later stages of the disease maintain his or her ability to use the bathroom independently for several more months, a benefit for both the person with Alzheimer’s and caregivers.

    Memantine is believed to work by regulating glutamate, an important brain chemical. When produced in excessive amounts, glutamate may lead to brain cell death. Because NMDA antagonists work differently from cholinesterase inhibitors, the two types of drugs can be prescribed in combination.

    The FDA has also approved donepezil, the rivastigmine patch, and a combination medication of memantine and donepezil for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimers.

    Drug Name For More Information
    Aducanumab
    • Intravenous: Dose is determined by a persons weight given over one hour every four weeks most people will start with a lower dose and over a period of time increase the amount of medicine to reach the full prescription dose
    • Tablet: Once a day dosage may be increased over time if well tolerated
    • Orally disintegrating tablet: Same dosing regimen as above

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    Can Alzheimer’s Disease Be Prevented

    As the exact cause of Alzheimer’s disease is not clear, there’s no known way to prevent the condition.

    But there are things you can do that may reduce your risk or delay the onset of dementia, such as:

    These measures have other health benefits, such as lowering your risk of cardiovascular disease and improving your overall mental health.

    Read more about preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

    What Conditions Can Be Mistaken For Dementia

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    The term dementia refers to a specific group of symptoms related to a decline in mental ability. Often, people who experience subtle short-term memory changes, are easily confused, or exhibit different behaviors or personality traits are mistakenly thought to have dementia. These symptoms could be the result of a variety of other conditions or disorders, including other neurocognitive disorders such as Parkinsons disease, brain growths or tumors, mild cognitive impairment , and mood disorders, like depression.

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    Stage : Mild Dementia

    At this stage, individuals may start to become socially withdrawn and show changes in personality and mood. Denial of symptoms as a defense mechanism is commonly seen in stage 4. Behaviors to look for include:

    • Difficulty remembering things about one’s personal history
    • Disorientation
    • Difficulty recognizing faces and people

    In stage 4 dementia, individuals have no trouble recognizing familiar faces or traveling to familiar locations. However, patients in this stage will often avoid challenging situations in order to hide symptoms or prevent stress or anxiety.

    Can Dementia Suddenly Get Worse

    The progression of dementia depends on the underlying disease. Some diseases have a rapid progression. Others progress more slowly. Any sudden change with either slow or rapid progression should be evaluated for another cause. In most cases, changes with dementia may seem like they came out of the blue when they actually may have been slowly developing in the background. The best way to prepare for changes and manage expectations is through information. Your doctor and medical team will be a valuable resource. There are a variety of educational resources that are also available through the Alzheimers Association.

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    How Does Alzheimer’s Disease Progress

    The rate of progression of the disease varies from person to person.

    However, the disease does lead eventually to complete dependence and finally death, usually from another illness such as pneumonia. A person may live from three to twenty years with Alzheimer’s disease, with the average being seven to ten years.

    What Differences Are There To Late Onset Dementia

    Pen And Paper Test Can Detect Alzheimer’s Symptoms Early, Experts Say

    When compared to older people, younger people affected by dementia are more likely to:

    • have a rarer form of dementia affecting behaviour and social functioning
    • have a familial/inherited form of dementia
    • report significantly higher psychological and physical distress
    • experience employment issues
    • have significant financial commitments such as a mortgage
    • have a younger and more dependent family
    • have additional caring responsibility for parents

    There are differences in the types of dementia commonly diagnosed in younger people with dementia compared to those of an older age. For example, only about a third of dementias diagnosed in younger people are of the Alzheimers type in comparison to about 60% in the older age group. For more information visit our facts and figures page.

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    The Seven Stages Of Dementia

    One of the most difficult things to hear about dementia is that, in most cases, dementia is irreversible and incurable. However, with an early diagnosis and proper care, the progression of some forms of dementia can be managed and slowed down. The cognitive decline that accompanies dementia conditions does not happen all at once – the progression of dementia can be divided into seven distinct, identifiable stages.

    Learning about the stages of dementia can help with identifying signs and symptoms early on, as well as assisting sufferers and caretakers in knowing what to expect in further stages. The earlier dementia is diagnosed, the sooner treatment can start.

    How Is Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosed

    There is currently no single test to identify Alzheimer’s disease. The diagnosis is made only after careful clinical consultation.

    The clinical diagnosis might include:

    • A detailed medical history
    • Lumbar puncture for cerebral spinal fluid tests
    • Medical imaging

    These tests will help to eliminate other conditions with similar symptoms such as nutritional deficiencies or depression. After eliminating other causes, a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease can be made with about 80% to 90% accuracy if the symptoms and signs are appropriate. The diagnosis can only be confirmed after death by examination of the brain tissue.

    It is important to have an early and accurate diagnosis to determine whether a treatable condition other than Alzheimer’s disease, is causing the symptoms. If Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed, medical treatment and other assistance can be discussed.

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    Stage : Very Mild Changes

    You still might not notice anything amiss in your loved one’s behavior, but they may be picking up on small differences, things that even a doctor doesn’t catch. This could include forgetting words or misplacing objects.

    At this stage, subtle symptoms of Alzheimer’s don’t interfere with their ability to work or live independently.

    Keep in mind that these symptoms might not be Alzheimer’s at all, but simply normal changes from aging.

    Signs Of Early Onset Dementia

    How to Prevent or Delay Alzheimers Disease

    It is important to recognize the signs of early-onset dementia. Even though we dont have a cure or treatment for dementia, having a diagnosis can help families plan for the future and address quality of life issues. These are some of the signs of the mental decline associated with early-onset dementia.

    • Memory problems and difficulty learning and retaining new information
    • Asking the same information over and over again
    • Trouble solving problems like keeping up with paying bills, cooking, or following directions
    • Losing track of the day or time of year
    • Trouble with depth perception or other visual problems
    • Getting lost or wandering

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    Recognition And Coordination Difficulties

    A person showing early signs of dementia may put everyday things in unusual places . They may have difficulty recognising familiar items such as a chair, soap, toothbrush, cutlery, kettle, coffee jar, cooker or fridge.

    Signs of a loss of coordination skills can include struggling to undo or do up buttons, to tie or untie shoes and neckties, and to use a hair brush or razor. They may be more subtle, such as putting down a cup of tea too close to the edge of a table or having difficulties lifting a teapot or kettle or using a knife to cut vegetables or fruit.

    Changes In Mood Or Emotion

    The person may be more anxious, frightened or sad, and so at risk of depression. It is also common to become more irritable perhaps in frustration at lost abilities or easily upset. A person can often be more withdrawn, lack self-confidence and lose interest in hobbies or people.

    Changes in behaviour are not common in early-stage dementia, other than in FTD. A person with behavioural variant FTD may lose their inhibitions and behave in socially inappropriate ways. They may also act impulsively and lose empathy for others.

    Significant physical changes at this stage tend to be limited to DLB, where problems with movement are similar to Parkinsons disease. If someone with vascular or mixed dementia has a stroke, this can lead to weak limbs on one side.

    Need help finding dementia information?

    Everybody forgets things from time to time. But if you or other people are noticing that memory problems are getting worse, or affecting everyday life, it could be a sign of dementia.

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    What Is The 30 Question Cognitive Test

    The MiniMental State Examination or Folstein test is a 30 -point questionnaire that is used extensively in clinical and research settings to measure cognitive impairment. It is commonly used in medicine and allied health to screen for dementia.

    The Alzheimers Warning Signs You Should Know

    Why Getting an Early Diagnosis for Dementia Can Make All the Difference

    Its common for older adults to experience what we call senior moments temporary lapses of memory that occur while completing common, everyday activities. This can include misplaced keys, losing glasses, forgetting where you parked your car, or leaving a shopping list at home.

    These mental glitches are usually associated with aging and should not cause much concern. However, when problems with memory begin to interfere with the ability to function normally at home or start to disrupt everyday life and put you in a dangerous situation, it may be time to seek help from a medical professional.

    Alzheimers disease is a type of dementia that causes problems with cognitive thinking, language, behavior, and memory. It is the most common form of dementia among the elderly, with symptoms that gradually worsen over time.

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