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Is Alzheimer’s Worse Than Dementia

What Causes Parkinson Disease

3 Mistakes to Avoid that Make Sundowning Symptoms Worse in Dementia

Parkinson disease arises from decreased dopamine production in the brain. The absence of dopamine makes it hard for the brain to coordinate muscle movements. Low dopamine also contributes to mood and cognitive problems later in the course of the disease. Experts don’t know what triggers the development of Parkinson disease most of the time. Early onset Parkinson disease is often inherited and is the result of certain gene defects.

Is Vascular Dementia Worse Than Alzheimers At The End Stage

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Treatments For Vascular Dementia

There’s currently no cure for vascular dementia and there’s no way to reverse any loss of brain cells that happened before the condition was diagnosed.

But treatment can sometimes help slow down vascular dementia.

Treatment aims to tackle the underlying cause, which may reduce the speed at which brain cells are lost.

This will often involve:

Other treatments, including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dementia activities and psychological therapies, can help reduce the impact of any existing problems.

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Managing Alzheimer’s Disease Behavior

Common behavioral symptoms of Alzheimers include sleeplessness, wandering, agitation, anxiety, and aggression. Scientists are learning why these symptoms occur and are studying new treatments drug and nondrug to manage them. Research has shown that treating behavioral symptoms can make people with Alzheimers more comfortable and makes things easier for caregivers.

How Is Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosed

Which Is Worse: Dementia Or Alzheimer

There is currently no single test to identify Alzheimer’s disease. The diagnosis is made only after careful clinical consultation.

The clinical diagnosis might include:

  • A detailed medical history
  • Lumbar puncture for cerebral spinal fluid tests
  • Medical imaging

These tests will help to eliminate other conditions with similar symptoms such as nutritional deficiencies or depression. After eliminating other causes, a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease can be made with about 80% to 90% accuracy if the symptoms and signs are appropriate. The diagnosis can only be confirmed after death by examination of the brain tissue.

It is important to have an early and accurate diagnosis to determine whether a treatable condition other than Alzheimer’s disease, is causing the symptoms. If Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed, medical treatment and other assistance can be discussed.

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Symptoms In The Later Stages Of Dementia

As dementia progresses, memory loss and difficulties with communication often become severe. In the later stages, the person is likely to neglect their own health, and require constant care and attention.

The most common symptoms of advanced dementia include:

  • memory problems people may not recognise close family and friends, or remember where they live or where they are
  • communication problems some people may eventually lose the ability to speak altogether. Using non-verbal means of communication, such as facial expressions, touch and gestures, can help
  • mobility problems many people become less able to move about unaided. Some may eventually become unable to walk and require a wheelchair or be confined to bed
  • behavioural problems a significant number of people will develop what are known as “behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia”. These may include increased agitation, depressive symptoms, anxiety, wandering, aggression, or sometimes hallucinations
  • bladder incontinence is common in the later stages of dementia, and some people will also experience bowel incontinence
  • appetite and weight loss problems are both common in advanced dementia. Many people have trouble eating or swallowing, and this can lead to choking, chest infections and other problems. Alzheimer’s Society has a useful factsheet on eating and drinking

Treatable Causes Of Dementia

There are many conditions that can cause dementia-like symptoms that can sometimes be stopped or even reversed with treatment. These conditions include:

  • Side effects of certain medicines
  • Emotional problems, such as stress, anxiety, or depression
  • Certain vitamin deficiencies
  • Blood clots, tumors, or infections in the brain
  • Delirium, a sudden state of confusion and disorientation
  • Head injury, such as a concussion from a fall or accident
  • Thyroid, kidney, or liver problems
  • Normal pressure hydrocephalus, an abnormal buildup of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain

Talk with your doctor if you experience serious memory problems or other symptoms of dementia. A proper diagnosis is important to getting the right treatment.

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Outlook For Vascular Dementia

Vascular dementia will usually get worse over time. This can happen in sudden steps, with periods in between where the symptoms do not change much, but it’s difficult to predict when this will happen.

Home-based help will usually be needed, and some people will eventually need care in a nursing home.

Although treatment can help, vascular dementia can significantly shorten life expectancy.

But this is highly variable, and many people live for several years with the condition, or die from some other cause.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with dementia, remember that you’re not alone. The NHS and social services, as well as voluntary organisations, can provide advice and support for you and your family.

What Is Alzheimer’s Disease

There is more to a person than the dementia

The CDC explains that Alzheimer’s is the most common type of dementia, a term used to describe “impaired ability to remember, think, or make decisions that interferes with doing everyday activities.” In total, 60 to 80 percent of reported cases of dementia are Alzheimer’s.

It is caused by specific changes in the brain, in areas that control thought, memory and language. In short, Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease, often beginning with mild memory losslike forgetting recent events or conversations. “People with Alzheimer’s disease have changes in different aspects of their thinking abilities that eventually affect daily function, starting with complex tasks, but over time eventually affecting even basic tasks,” explains Richard Marottoli, MD, Yale Medicine geriatrician and professor of medicine at Yale School of Medicine.

Over time, memory continues to worsen, possibly to the point where an individual may lose their ability to carry on a conversation or respond to their environment. Other issues can include difficulty walking or talking or personality changes

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The 27 Life Events That Can Damage The Brain Lead To Alzheimers

These stressful life events have been linked to causing damage to the brain, which could lead to Alzheimers.

The likelihood of developing the disease could increase after experiencing just one of the events listed below:

  • Being expelled or suspended from school
  • Being fired from a job
  • Being sent away from home
  • Cheating partner
  • Loss of home to fire or flood
  • Parent cannot find work
  • Repeating a year of school
  • Serious accident involving child
  • Sexual assault
  • Do you suspect that stressful life events can lead to Alzheimers and have you seen the effects of stress on brain health in your family? Share your stories with us in the comments below.

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    Who Has Alzheimers Disease

    • In 2020, as many as 5.8 million Americans were living with Alzheimers disease.1
    • Younger people may get Alzheimers disease, but it is less common.
    • The number of people living with the disease doubles every 5 years beyond age 65.
    • This number is projected to nearly triple to 14 million people by 2060.1
    • Symptoms of the disease can first appear after age 60, and the risk increases with age.

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    What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinson Disease

    Parkinson disease symptoms usually start out mild, and then progressively get much worse. The first signs are often so subtle that many people don’t seek medical attention at first. These are common symptoms of Parkinson disease:

    • Tremors that affect the face and jaw, legs, arms, and hands
    • Slow, stiff walking

    Warning Signs And Symptoms

    Dementia: Alzheimer

    The symptoms of dementia range in severity, and they also vary depending on the area of the brain that the condition affects. The most

    • walking around for no apparent reason
    • inappropriate behaviors, such as social and sexual disinhibition

    Symptoms can take time to appear, and significant damage may be present before a person visits a doctor. This may make treatment more challenging.

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    Which Is Worse: Dementia Or Alzheimer’s

    Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It fall under the umbrella of age-related decline in mental abilities, known as dementia. The disease disturbs all facets of a person’s life: how they think, feel, and act. www.netmeds.com offers UP TO 20% OFF on essential medicines as we understand that chronic diseases place a high financial & emotional burden on the patient’s family.

    It is estimated that around 4 million people in India are living with some form of dementia??, including Alzheimer’s disease. By the year 2020, around 70% of the world’s population aged 60 & older will be living in developing countries, with 14.2% in India. Alzheimer’s disease is a growing public health problem in India, whose ageing population is increasing rapidly.

    Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, also known as vascular cognitive impairment or vascular neurocognitive disorder are all dementia types. The 2 types of dementia symptoms and characteristics overlap, but specialised healthcare providers are trained to recognize the difference between Alzheimers and vascular dementia.

    Vascular dementia:
    Alzheimer’s:

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common kind of dementia. This disease progressively worsens, where dementia symptoms increasingly worsen over a period of several years.

    Tips on Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease or Dementia
    • Be physically active

    How Is Parkinson Disease Diagnosed

    Parkinson disease can be hard to diagnose. No single test can identify it. Parkinson can be easily mistaken for another health condition. A healthcare provider will usually take a medical history, including a family history to find out if anyone else in your family has Parkinson’s disease. He or she will also do a neurological exam. Sometimes, an MRI or CT scan, or some other imaging scan of the brain can identify other problems or rule out other diseases.

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    Symptoms Specific To Vascular Dementia

    Vascular dementia is the second most common cause of dementia, after Alzheimer’s. Some people have both vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, often called “mixed dementia”.

    Symptoms of vascular dementia are similar to Alzheimer’s disease, although memory loss may not be as obvious in the early stages.

    Symptoms can sometimes develop suddenly and quickly get worse, but they can also develop gradually over many months or years.

    Specific symptoms can include:

    • stroke-like symptoms: including muscle weakness or temporary paralysis on one side of the body
    • movement problems difficulty walking or a change in the way a person walks
    • thinking problems having difficulty with attention, planning and reasoning
    • mood changes depression and a tendency to become more emotional

    Read more about vascular dementia.

    What We Know About Dementia

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    The National Institute on Aging says that dementia affects approximately 3.4 million Americans, or 13.9 percent, of the U.S. population ages 71 and older and is usually caused by brain damage associated with Alzheimers disease, vascular dementia or Parkinsons disease. And in Canada, the number of people living with dementia is expected to rise 66% by the time we reach 2031.

    It is important to differentiate the various types of dementia for about 70% of patients, a diagnosis of dementia will be accompanied by a diagnosis of Alzheimers disease. Although these terms are often used interchangeably, Alzheimers and dementia are not one in the same. Dementia is a loss of brain function that refers to a group of illnesses.

    Although dementia may be a symptom of Alzheimers, it may have other underlying causes, such as Picks disease, hypothyroidism or head trauma. While Alzheimers is the leading cause of dementia, vascular dementia, which is often caused by stroke, accounts for about 17% of all dementia cases.

    While people will experience dementia differently, most people with dementia share some of the same symptoms that may come and go.

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    Living With Parkinson Disease

    These measures can help you live well with Parkinson disease:

    • An exercise routine can help keep muscles flexible and mobile. Exercise also releases natural brain chemicals that can improve emotional well-being.
    • High protein meals can benefit your brain chemistry
    • Physical, occupational, and speech therapy can help your ability to care for yourself and communicate with others
    • If you or your family has questions about Parkinson disease, want information about treatment, or need to find support, you can contact the American Parkinson Disease Association.

    What Causes Alzheimers Disease

    In recent years, scientists have made tremendous progress in better understanding Alzheimers and the momentum continues to grow. Still, scientists dont yet fully understand what causes Alzheimers disease in most people. In people with early-onset Alzheimers, a genetic mutation may be the cause. Late-onset Alzheimers arises from a complex series of brain changes that may occur over decades. The causes probably include a combination of genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. The importance of any one of these factors in increasing or decreasing the risk of developing Alzheimers may differ from person to person.

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    What Are The Warning Signs Of Alzheimers Disease

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    Alzheimers disease is not a normal part of aging. Memory problems are typically one of the first warning signs of Alzheimers disease and related dementias.

    In addition to memory problems, someone with symptoms of Alzheimers disease may experience one or more of the following:

    • Memory loss that disrupts daily life, such as getting lost in a familiar place or repeating questions.
    • Trouble handling money and paying bills.
    • Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure.
    • Misplacing things and being unable to retrace steps to find them.
    • Changes in mood, personality, or behavior.

    Even if you or someone you know has several or even most of these signs, it doesnt mean its Alzheimers disease. Know the 10 warning signs .

    How Is Alzheimers Diagnosed And Treated

    Are Dementia Signs Worse In Winter?

    Doctors may ask questions about health, conduct cognitive tests, and carry out standard medical tests to determine whether to diagnose a person with Alzheimers disease. If a doctor thinks a person may have Alzheimers, they may refer the person to a specialist, such as a neurologist, for further assessment. Specialists may conduct additional tests, such as brain scans or lab tests of spinal fluid, to help make a diagnosis. These tests measure signs of the disease, such as changes in brain size or levels of certain proteins.

    There is currently no cure for Alzheimers, though there are several medicines approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that can help manage some symptoms of the disease along with coping strategies to manage behavioral symptoms. In 2021, FDA provided accelerated approval for a new medication, aducanumab, that targets the protein beta-amyloid, which accumulates abnormally in the brains of people with Alzheimers. The new medication helps to reduce amyloid deposits, but has not yet been shown to affect clinical symptoms or outcomes, such as progression of cognitive decline or dementia.

    Most medicines work best for people in the early or middle stages of Alzheimers. Researchers are exploring other drug therapies and nondrug interventions to delay or prevent the disease as well as treat its symptoms.

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    Common Early Symptoms Of Dementia

    Different types of dementia can affect people differently, and everyone will experience symptoms in their own way.

    However, there are some common early symptoms that may appear some time before a diagnosis of dementia. These include:

    • memory loss
    • difficulty concentrating
    • finding it hard to carry out familiar daily tasks, such as getting confused over the correct change when shopping
    • struggling to follow a conversation or find the right word
    • being confused about time and place
    • mood changes

    These symptoms are often mild and may get worse only very gradually. It’s often termed “mild cognitive impairment” as the symptoms are not severe enough to be diagnosed as dementia.

    You might not notice these symptoms if you have them, and family and friends may not notice or take them seriously for some time. In some people, these symptoms will remain the same and not worsen. But some people with MCI will go on to develop dementia.

    Dementia is not a natural part of ageing. This is why it’s important to talk to a GP sooner rather than later if you’re worried about memory problems or other symptoms.

    How Does Alzheimer’s Disease Affect The Brain

    Scientists continue to unravel the complex brain changes involved in Alzheimers disease. Changes in the brain may begin a decade or more before symptoms appear. During this very early stage of Alzheimers, toxic changes are taking place in the brain, including abnormal buildups of proteins that form amyloid plaques and tau tangles. Previously healthy neurons stop functioning, lose connections with other neurons, and die. Many other complex brain changes are thought to play a role in Alzheimers as well.

    The damage initially appears to take place in the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex, which are parts of the brain that are essential in forming memories. As more neurons die, additional parts of the brain are affected and begin to shrink. By the final stage of Alzheimers, damage is widespread and brain tissue has shrunk significantly.

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    Tips For Dementia Care

    Dementia can be challenging for both patients and caregivers but knowing what to expect can help ease the journey. Caregivers may not be able to anticipate the level of dementia on a daily basis, but they can be prepared to manage the varying symptoms of dementia as they progress.

    The different stages of dementia require different degrees of caregiving. 2 With mild dementia, people may still be able to function independently, however, theyll experience memory lapses that affect daily life, such as forgetting words or where things are located.

    People experiencing moderate dementia will likely need more assistance in their daily lives as it becomes harder for them to perform daily activities and self-care. They may hallucinate, get lost easily and forget where they are, and not remember what day of the week it is.

    Someone with severe dementia will likely lose their ability to communicate and need full-time daily assistance with tasks such as eating and dressing. They may not remember their own name or the names of others. Physical activity and ability may be seriously impaired and they may be more susceptible to infections, such as pneumonia.

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