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What Are The Signs Of Alzheimer’s Disease

How Is Alzheimers Disease Diagnosed

Ten Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

Talk to a doctor if you or a loved one is finding it increasingly difficult to perform day-to-day tasks, or if you or a loved one is experiencing increased memory loss. They may refer you to a doctor who specializes in AD.

Theyll conduct a medical exam and a neurological exam to aid in the diagnosis. They may also choose to complete an imaging test of your brain. They can only make a diagnosis after the medical evaluation is completed.

Theres no cure for AD at this time. The symptoms of AD can sometimes be treated with medications meant to help improve memory loss or decrease sleeping difficulties.

Research is still being done on possible alternative treatments.

Diminished Sense Of Smell

You used to be able to smell those fresh-out-of-the-oven chocolate chip cookies immediately, and now you hardly notice them. According to the National Institute on Aging, losing your sense of smell can be a symptom of Alzheimer’s, so it’s crucial to bring it up to your doctor if you notice any changes. Loss of smell and taste is also a symptom of coronavirus. And for more concerning COVID-19 signs, check out 13 Coronavirus Symptoms That Are More Common Than a Sore Throat.

Not Being Able To Follow Recipes

Something as minor as whipping up a home-cooked meal can be a struggle for those in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. If someone loses their ability to follow a recipeespecially one they’ve made a thousand timesthat might be an indication of the cognitive changes that commonly occur in the early stages of the disease.

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How Is Alzheimers Diagnosed And Treated

Doctors may ask questions about health, conduct cognitive tests, and carry out standard medical tests to determine whether to diagnose a person with Alzheimers disease. If a doctor thinks a person may have Alzheimers, they may refer the person to a specialist, such as a neurologist, for further assessment. Specialists may conduct additional tests, such as brain scans or lab tests of spinal fluid, to help make a diagnosis. These tests measure signs of the disease, such as changes in brain size or levels of certain proteins.

There is currently no cure for Alzheimers, though there are several medicines approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that can help manage some symptoms of the disease along with coping strategies to manage behavioral symptoms. In 2021, FDA provided;accelerated approval;for a new medication, aducanumab, that targets the protein beta-amyloid, which accumulates abnormally in the brains of people with Alzheimers. The new medication helps to reduce amyloid deposits, but has not yet been shown to affect clinical symptoms or outcomes, such as progression of cognitive decline or dementia.

Most medicines work best for people in the early or middle stages of Alzheimers.;Researchers are exploring;other drug therapies and nondrug interventions;to delay or prevent the disease as well as treat its symptoms.

Is There Treatment Available

The 10 Warning Signs of Alzheimers Disease  Walnut Ridge

At present there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. However, one group of drugs called cholinergeric drugs appears to be providing some temporary improvement in cognitive functioning for some people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease.

Drugs can also be prescribed for secondary symptoms such as restlessness or depression or to help the person with dementia sleep better.

Community support is available for the person with Alzheimer’s disease, their families and carers. This support can make a positive difference to managing dementia. Dementia Australia provides support, information and counselling for people affected by dementia. Dementia Australia also aims to provide up-to-date information about drug treatments.

Further help

For more information contact the National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500.

For a range of books and videos contact our;Library.

For advice, common sense approaches and practical strategies on the issues most commonly raised about dementia, read our Help Sheets.

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How Does Alzheimer’s Disease Progress

The rate of progression of the disease varies from person to person.

However, the disease does lead eventually to complete dependence and finally death, usually from another illness such as pneumonia. A person may live from three to twenty years with Alzheimer’s disease, with the average being seven to ten years.

How Your Driving Might Reveal Early Signs Of Alzheimer’s

Everyone’s driving changes as they age. But for some people, subtle differences emerge in how they control a vehicle, which scientists say are associated with the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

In an experiment to find out whether these driving differences can be detected using Global Positioning System-based location-tracking devices, a group of over-65s in Missouri in the US agreed to have their driving closely monitored for one year.

The DRIVES Study at Washington University in St. Louis, led by Catherine Roe and Ganesh Babulal and funded by the National Institute on Aging, wanted to find out was whether just studying the driving habits of this group alone could reveal the start of the disease – without the need for invasive or expensive medical procedures.

After 365 days accumulating the information, they are confident that it could.

Among the 139 people involved in the study, medical tests had already shown around half of them had very early or “preclinical” Alzheimer’s disease. The other half did not. Analysis of their driving revealed detectable differences between the two groups.

Specifically, those with preclinical Alzheimer’s tended to drive more slowly, make abrupt changes, travel less at night, and logged fewer miles overall, for example. They also visited a smaller variety of destinations when driving, sticking to slightly more confined routes.

But the prediction based on age and driving alone was almost as precise.

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Becoming Totally Uninterested In Everything

One of the most common changes those with Alzheimer’s go through is no longer being interested in things they used to loveor no longer being interested in anything, for that matter. A 2001 study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society revealed that, while disinterest is a frequent symptom among those with Alzheimer’s, it’s also one of the most under-recognized signs. Researchers at the University of Exeter conducted a study in 2019, and they found that nearly half of all people with dementia experience apathy.

Early Onset Alzheimers Disease

Alzheimers Disease – Early Signs (video)

Although age is the main risk factor for Alzheimers disease, this is not just a condition that affects older adults.

According to the Alzheimers Association, early onset Alzheimers disease affects around 200,000 U.S. adults under the age of 65 years. Many people with this condition are in their 40s or 50s.

In many cases, doctors do not know why younger people develop this condition. Several rare genes can cause the condition. When there is a genetic cause, it is known as familial Alzheimers disease.

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What Are The Symptoms Of Alzheimer’s Disease

Memory loss is usually the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Often the person who has a memory problem doesn’t notice it, but family and friends do.

Having some short-term memory loss in your 60s and 70s is common, but this doesn’t mean it’s Alzheimer’s disease.

Normal memory problems aren’t the same as the kind of memory problems that may be caused by Alzheimer’s disease. For example, normally you might forget:

  • Parts of an experience.
  • Where your car is parked.
  • A person’s name.

With Alzheimer’s disease, you might forget:

  • An entire experience.
  • What your car looks like.
  • Having ever known a certain person.

Following are some of the symptoms of mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer’s disease. Symptoms vary as the disease progresses. Talk to your doctor if a friend or family member has any of the signs.

Mild Alzheimer’s disease

Usually, a person with mild Alzheimer’s disease:

  • Avoids new and unfamiliar situations.
  • Has delayed reactions.
  • Has trouble learning and remembering new information.
  • Starts speaking more slowly than in the past.
  • Starts using poor judgment and making wrong decisions.
  • May have mood swings and become depressed, grouchy, or restless.

These symptoms often are more obvious when the person is in a new and unfamiliar place or situation.

Some people have memory loss called mild cognitive impairment. People with this condition are at risk for Alzheimer’s disease or another type of dementia. But not all people with mild cognitive impairment progress to dementia.

Facts About Alzheimer Disease

Alzheimer disease is becoming more common as the general population gets older and lives longer.;Alzheimer disease;usually affects people older than 65. A small number of people have early-onset Alzheimer disease, which starts when they are in their 30s or 40s.

People live for an average of 8 years after their symptoms appear. But the disease can progress quickly in some people and slowly in others. Some people live as long as 20 years with the disease.

No one knows what causes Alzheimer disease. Genes, environment, lifestyle, and overall health may all play a role.

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Warning Signs Of Dementia Infographic

Our infographic showing 10 warning signs of dementia.

  • Date:02nd June 2017

Every person is unique and dementia effects every individual differently, with no two people experiencing symptoms in exactly the same way. Symptoms also vary by type of dementia. Alzheimers disease is the most common type of dementia. 10 of the most common warning signs are shown below and depicted in the infographic:

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation to time and place
  • Poor or decreased judgement
  • Problems keeping track of things
  • Misplacing things
  • Changes in mood and behaviour
  • Trouble with images and spatial relationships
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities
  • If these signs are new, they may be a sign of dementia. Dementia is not a part of normal aging. If you think that these problems are affecting your daily life, or the life of someone you know, you should talk to your doctor or seek out more information from your national dementia of Alzheimers association.

    During World Alzheimers Month, we are encouraging everyone to Know Dementia, Know Alzheimers.;By spotting the warning signs of dementia, you can seek out information, advice and support and potentially lead to a timely diagnosis.

    Stages Of Alzheimer Disease

    Pin on alzheimers+aging

    The stages of Alzheimer disease usually follow a progressive pattern. But each person moves through the disease stages in his or her own way. Knowing these stages helps healthcare providers and family members make decisions about how to care for someone who has Alzheimer;disease.

    Preclinical stage.;Changes in the brain;begin years before a person shows any signs of the disease. This time period is called preclinical Alzheimer disease and it;can last for years. ;

    Mild, early stage.;Symptoms at this stage include mild forgetfulness. This may seem like the mild forgetfulness that often comes with aging. But it may also include problems with concentration.;

    A person may still live independently at this stage, but may;have problems:

    • Remembering a name

    • Staying organized

    • Managing money

    The person may be aware of memory lapses and their friends, family or neighbors may also notice these difficulties.;

    Moderate, middle stage.;This is typically the longest stage, usually lasting many years. ;At this stage, symptoms include:

    • Increasing trouble remembering events

    • Problems learning new things

    • Trouble with planning complicated events, like a dinner

    • Trouble remembering their own name, but not details about their own life, such as address and phone number

    • Problems with reading, writing, and working with numbers

    As the disease progresses, the person may:

    Physical changes may occur as well. Some people have sleep problems. ;Wandering away from home is often a concern.;

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    What Are The Symptoms Of Early

    For most people with early-onset Alzheimer disease, the symptoms closely mirror those of other forms of Alzheimer disease.

    Early symptoms:

    • Withdrawal from work and social situations

    • Changes in mood and personality

    Later symptoms:

    • Severe mood swings and behavior changes

    • Deepening confusion about time, place, and life events

    • Suspicions about friends, family, or caregivers

    • Trouble;speaking, swallowing, or walking

    • Severe memory loss

    The Signs Of This Form Of Dementia Are Different From Those Of Normal Age

    Did you ever stride purposefully into a room, stand in one spot, and then wonder what you’d intended to do? Have you ever lost your house keys, or forgot where you parked the car? Relax. Occasional memory slips are natural.

    “Everyone has these experiences sometimes, but if they frequently happen to you or someone you love, they may be early signs of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Dr. Scott M. McGinnis, a neurologist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Medical Editor of the Harvard Special Health Report A Guide to Coping with Alzheimer’s Disease.

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    Trouble With Visual Images Or Spatial Relationships

    People with Alzheimers can develop vision problems that are above and beyond age-related issues such as cataracts. They may have difficulty reading, determining colour or patterns, or judging distance. They might think that someone else is looking at them from a mirror or be unable to see a meal apart from the plate it is on. At Dementia Support, we combat these issues by providing clean and open spaces, to make tasks as simple and straight forward as possible. We avoid complex patterning and unnecessary clutter to prevent any stress that may be caused by an inability to comprehend what those suffering from Alzheimers are looking at.

    What Is Alzheimer’s Disease

    What are the common early signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease?

    Alzheimers disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting up to 70% of all people with dementia. It was first recorded in 1907 by Dr Alois Alzheimer. Dr Alzheimer reported the case of Auguste Deter, a middle-aged woman with dementia and specific changes in her brain. For the next 60 years Alzheimers disease was considered a rare condition that affected people under the age of 65. It was not until the 1970s that Dr Robert Katzman declared that “senile dementia” and Alzheimers disease were the same condition and that neither were a normal part of aging.

    Alzheimers disease can be either;sporadic;or;familial.

    Sporadic;Alzheimer’s disease can affect adults at any age, but usually occurs after age 65 and is the most common form of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Familial;Alzheimers disease is a very rare genetic condition, caused by a mutation in one of several genes. The presence of mutated genes means that the person will eventually develop Alzheimer’s disease, usually in their 40’s or 50’s.

    The Healthy Human Brain

    Behind the ears and temples are the temporal lobes of the brain. These regions process speech and working memory, and also higher emotions such as empathy, morality and regret. Beneath the forebrain are the more primitive brain regions such as the limbic system. The limbic system is a structure that is common to all mammals and processes our desires and many emotions. Also in the limbic system is the hippocampus a region that is vital for forming new memories.

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    Emotion And Behavior Treatments

    The emotional and behavioral changes linked with Alzheimers disease can be challenging to manage. People may increasingly experience irritability, anxiety, depression, restlessness, sleep problems, and other difficulties.

    Treating the underlying causes of these changes can be helpful. Some may be side effects of medications, discomfort from other medical conditions, or problems with hearing or vision.

    Identifying what triggered these behaviors and avoiding or changing these things can help people deal with the changes. Triggers may include changing environments, new caregivers, or being asked to bathe or change clothes.

    It is often possible to change the environment to resolve obstacles and boost the persons comfort, security, and peace of mind.

    The Alzheimers Association offer a list of helpful coping tips for caregivers.

    In some cases, a doctor may recommend medications for these symptoms, such as:

    • antidepressants, for low mood

    Assessing Your Mental Abilities

    A specialist will usually assess your mental abilities using a special series of questions.

    One widely used test is the mini mental state examination . This involves being asked to carry out activities such as memorising a short list of objects;correctly and identifying the current day of the week, month and year. Different memory clinics may also use other, longer tests.;

    The MMSE isn’t used to diagnose;Alzheimer’s disease,;but it’s useful to initially assess areas of difficulty that a person with;the condition may have. This helps specialists to make decisions about treatment and whether more tests are necessary.

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    Trouble And Hesitation Initiating Conversations

    It takes a certain skillset to make good conversationperiod. And it takes a lot of confidence to start them, too. But if you’ve always been a social butterfly and you suddenly find that you can’t so much as utter a greeting to an old friend, this could be one of the early signs of Alzheimer’s, as the Alzheimer’s Association notes.

    Similar to social withdrawal, those with Alzheimer’s often avoid conversation in order to hide their mental decline. And for more surprising symptoms, here are 40 Signs of Poor Health No One Over 40 Should Ignore.

    Keep Things Simpleand Other Tips

    What you need to know about Alzheimers Disease ...

    Caregivers cannot stop Alzheimers-related changes in personality and behavior, but they can learn to cope with them. Here are some tips:

    • Keep things simple. Ask or say one thing at a time.
    • Have a daily routine, so the person knows when certain things will happen.
    • Reassure the person that he or she is safe and you are there to help.
    • Focus on his or her feelings rather than words. For example, say, You seem worried.
    • Dont argue or try to reason with the person.
    • Try not to show your frustration or anger. If you get upset, take deep breaths and count to 10. If its safe, leave the room for a few minutes.
    • Use humor when you can.
    • Give people who pace a lot a safe place to walk. Provide comfortable, sturdy shoes. Give them light snacks to eat as they walk, so they dont lose too much weight, and make sure they have enough to drink.
    • Try using music, singing, or dancing to distract the person.
    • Ask for help. For instance, say, Lets set the table or I need help folding the clothes.

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