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How Early Can Dementia Develop

Annual Report To Parliament On Canada’s Dementia Strategy

Hearing test could prevent dementia development

Each year the federal Minister of Health prepares a report to Parliament on the national dementia strategy.

The 2020 Report to Parliament shares a Canada-wide overview of some of the many dementia-related efforts underway across the country. This report highlights how many different organizations, including the federal government, are supporting the strategy’s national objectives and reflects the variety of those efforts.

Stages And Progression Of Lewy Body Dementia

Claudia Chaves, MD, is board-certified in cerebrovascular disease and neurology with a subspecialty certification in vascular neurology.

If you or someone you know has recently been diagnosed with Lewy body dementia, you might be wondering what to expect as the disease progresses. Is there a fairly typical progression like Alzheimer’s disease where it begins in early stages that are fairly uniform, then moves to middle stages and then to late stages? In Lewy body dementia, the answer is a bit more complicated.

How To Spot Early Indicators That Your Loved One May Have Alzheimers Or Dementia

by Patrick J. Kiger, AARP, Updated May 4, 2021| 0

En español | From age 50 on, its not unusual to have occasional trouble finding the right word or remembering where you put things.

But persistent difficulty with memory, cognition and ability to perform everyday tasks might be signs that something more serious is happening to a loved ones brain.

Dementia isnt actually a disease, according to the Mayo Clinic. Its a catch-all term for changes in the brain that cause a loss of functioning that interferes with daily life. Dementia can diminish focus, the ability to pay attention, language skills, problem-solving and visual perception. It also can make it difficult for a person to control his or her emotions and lead to personality changes.

More than 6 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s dementia, according to a 2021 report by the Alzheimer’s Association. Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of dementia, accounting for 60 percent to 70 percent of cases, but a range of brain illnesses can lead to the condition .

Diseases that cause dementia

These conditions are the leading causes of dementia. Many patients have mixed dementia, a combination of two or more types, such as Alzheimers and vascular dementia.

Vascular dementia. The second most common type of dementia is caused from damage to the vessels that supply blood to the brain. It tends to affect focus, organization, problem-solving and speed of thinking more noticeably than memory.

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Living With Vascular Dementia

Vascular dementia is a progressive disease that has no cure, but the rate at which the disease progresses can vary. Some people with vascular dementia may eventually need a high level of care due to the loss of mental and physical abilities. Family members may be able to care for a person with vascular dementia early on. But if the disease progresses, the person may need more specialized care.

Respite programs, adult daycare programs, and other resources can help the caregiver get some time away from the demands of caring for a loved one with vascular dementia.

Long-term care facilities that specialize in the care of people with dementias, Alzheimer’s, and other related conditions are often available if a person affected by vascular dementia can no longer be cared for at home. Your healthcare provider can recommend caregiver resources.

What Are The Signs Of Alzheimer’s Disease

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Scientists continue to unravel the complex brain changes involved in the onset and progression of Alzheimers disease. It seems likely that damage to the brain starts a decade or more before memory and other cognitive problems appear. During this preclinical stage of Alzheimers disease, people seem to be symptom-free, but toxic changes are taking place in the brain.

Damage occurring in the brain of someone with Alzheimers disease begins to show itself in very early clinical signs and symptoms. For most people with Alzheimersthose who have the late-onset varietysymptoms first appear in their mid-60s. Signs of early-onset Alzheimers begin between a persons 30s and mid-60s.

The first symptoms of Alzheimers vary from person to person. Memory problems are typically one of the first signs of cognitive impairment related to Alzheimers disease. Decline in non-memory aspects of cognition, such as word-finding, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may also signal the very early stages of Alzheimers disease. And some people may be diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. As the disease progresses, people experience greater memory loss and other cognitive difficulties.

Alzheimers disease progresses in several stages: preclinical, mild , moderate, and severe .

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Finding A Huge Gap In Services And Supports For Younger People

âI unfortunately ran into that brick wall where I was ineligible for just about everything because of my age.â â Faye.

Most social programs and services are designed for older people with dementia. In comparison, the number of programs designed for people living with young onset dementia is sparse.

People living with young onset dementia may not find the programs intended for older adults interesting or beneficial in respect to their needs. They may not feel comfortable in a seniorsâ program. And even if they were interested and comfortable in joining a program, they might be ineligible because of their age!

We have a gap in our knowledge about young onset dementia. As a result, there simply aren’t enough information, support, financial aid and services adapted for younger people living with dementia.

However, this is changing. The Young Onset Gap Analysis Project, initiated through the National Information Support and Education Committee and the Alzheimer Society of Canada , explored the gaps of available learning and support resources for people living with young onset dementia, and sought advice and feedback from those with lived experience.

The information from this report is being used to develop new resources dedicated to education and support for people living with young onset dementia, families, caregivers and healthcare providers.

What Causes Possible Early Dementia

We do not know exactly what causes MCI. We do know that most people with MCI eventually develop Alzheimer’s disease. Like Alzheimer’s disease, MCI is thought to be linked to abnormal deposits of certain proteins in the brain. Having low levels of certain brain chemicals called neurotransmitters is another feature of MCI and Alzheimer’s disease.

A small number of cases of MCI are related not to Alzheimer’s disease but to other causes of dementia. These include stroke, Parkinson disease, head injury, depression or extreme stress, drug interactions or side effects, or other medical conditions such as liver diseases or hormone disturbances. The number of conditions that can result in MCI and dementia is large.

The speed with which symptoms develop is often a clue to the cause of the MCI. MCI related to Alzheimer’s disease develops gradually in most cases. MCI of some other causes may develop more quickly.

The most common symptom of mild cognitive impairment by far is memory loss. Other, much less common symptoms include

  • disturbances of language ,
  • attention , and
  • orientation .

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What Happens After A Diagnosis Of Younger Onset Dementia

A diagnosis of younger onset dementia can come as a shock. The person affected, and their family and friends may all feel angry or sad. They might not believe it. There can be a huge sense of loss. These feelings are normal.

But help and support is available, and it is better to get it earlier than later.

Younger people with dementia need to think about several issues.

What Are The Symptoms Of Early

early onset dementia

For most people with early-onset Alzheimer disease, the symptoms closely mirror those of other forms of Alzheimer disease.

Early symptoms:

  • Withdrawal from work and social situations

  • Changes in mood and personality

Later symptoms:

  • Severe mood swings and behavior changes

  • Deepening confusion about time, place, and life events

  • Suspicions about friends, family, or caregivers

  • Trouble speaking, swallowing, or walking

  • Severe memory loss

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The Top 10 Signs Of Dementia And Alzheimer’s Disease

The key to managing Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia is to catch it early. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, brain changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease begin as long as 20 years before symptoms appear, so it pays to be on the lookout for any and all signs and symptoms.

Here are the top 10 warning signs of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease:

  • Memory loss that has an impact on daily life.This may include forgetting recently learned information, keeping track of important dates, and repeatedly asking for the same information.
  • Having trouble planning or solving problems.The patient may have trouble working with numbers, following a recipe, or keeping track of monthly expenses.
  • Difficulty completing familiar tasks.This could include basic tasks at home or at work such as driving to a familiar location, remembering the rules of a game, or performing tasks at work.
  • Increasing confusion with time or place.The patient might lose track of seasons, dates, and the passage of time in general they may have trouble understanding something if it isn’t happening immediately.
  • Trouble comprehending spatial relationships and visual imagery.This could take the form of difficulty reading, identifying colors, or judging distances.
  • Difficulty with words in writing or speaking.The patient might have trouble keeping track of a conversation, difficulty finding the right word, or call things by the wrong name.
  • What Are The Symptoms Of Younger Onset Dementia

    The symptoms of dementia are similar no matter what age they start. They include:

    • memory loss that interferes with daily life
    • confusion
    • withdrawing from friends and family
    • losing the ability to think clearly or make judgements
    • language problems
    • changes to behaviour

    Many conditions can produce symptoms that are similar to dementia, such as vitamin and hormone deficiencies, depression, medication, infections and brain tumours.

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    Loss Of Daily Life Skills

    A home that may not be as well kept as usual may be a sign that the person living there has dementia. They may lose the ability to do many of the things they normally do themselves, such as preparing meals, household chores and eating and drinking properly.

    They may also struggle to maintain their personal hygiene and getting dressed. Deciding what to wear, how to put things on and in the right order may become increasingly difficult. Getting around the house without walking into furniture and other items may also be a problem.

    How Is Vascular Dementia Treated

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    Vascular dementia can’t be cured. The main goal is to treat the underlying conditions that affect the blood flow to the brain. This can help cut the risk of further damage to brain tissue.

    Such treatments may include:

    • Medicines to manage blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, diabetes, and problems with blood clotting
    • Lifestyle changes, such as following a healthy diet, getting physical activity, quitting smoking, and quitting or decreasing alcohol consumption
    • Procedures to improve blood flow to the brain, such as carotid endarterectomy, angioplasty, and stenting the carotid arteries are located in the neck and provide blood flow from the heart to the brain
    • Medicines, such as cholinesterase inhibitors to treat the symptoms of dementia or antidepressants to help with depression or other symptoms

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    Key Points About Vascular Dementia

    • Vascular dementia is a disorder characterized by damaged brain tissue due to a lack of blood flow. Causes can include blood clots, ruptured blood vessels, or narrowing or hardening of blood vessels that supply the brain.
    • Symptoms can include problems with memory and concentration, confusion, changes in personality and behavior, loss of speech and language skills, and sometimes physical symptoms such as weakness or tremors.
    • Vascular dementia tends to progress over time. Treatments can’t cure the disease, but lifestyle changes and medicines to treat underlying causes might help slow its progress.
    • Surgical procedures to improve blood flow to the brain can also be helpful. Other medicines might slow the progression of dementia or help with some of the symptoms it can cause.
    • A person with vascular dementia may eventually need full-time nursing care or to stay in a long-term care facility.

    Who Is This Dementia Quiz For

    Below is a list of 10 questions designed for people who are concerned about memory loss. The questions relate to life experiences common among people who have been diagnosed with dementia, a neurocognitive disorder, and are based on criteria in the DSM-5 .

    Please read each question carefully, and indicate how often you have experienced the same or similar challenges in the past few months.

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    What Is The Treatment For Possible Early Dementia

    No treatment is known to stop or slow down memory loss in MCI. Medications used in Alzheimer’s disease and some other kinds of dementia may help in MCI, but this has not been proven. One area of ongoing research is whether people with MCI do better without treatmentkeeping in mind that medication can sometimes make cognitive symptoms worse. It is important that people with MCI be checked regularly to see if their condition has changed.

    People with MCI should remain physically, socially, and mentally active to the greatest extent possible. Physical activity helps maintain a healthy weight, promotes relaxation and healthy sleep, and lifts the mood. A daily walk is appropriate for many people with MCI. Social interaction also fosters a positive mood and helps prevent depression. Many senior centers offer activities that promote social interaction. Mentally challenging activities, such as crossword puzzles and “brain teasers,” may be helpful in holding off mental deterioration, but this has not been proven.

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    Dementia Stages: How Fast Dementia Progresses Stages Of Dementia And More

    Younger onset dementia (early onset dementia)

    Dementia is a progressive impairment of cognitive function caused by damage to the brain. Over time, a person with dementia will have increased difficulty with memory, understanding, communication, and reasoning.

    Healthcare providers frequently speak about a persons dementia in terms of stages. This can be helpful for communicating with family or other healthcare providers regarding the persons illness, and it is important for determining an appropriate care plan.

    How Fast Does Dementia Progress?

    It is important to note that dementia progresses at different speeds for every person, and for different types of dementia. The most well-known form of dementia, Alzheimers disease, is just one specific type of dementia, and tends to have the slowest progression of all types. Some factors that affect the rate of progression include:

    • Age
    • Repeated infections

    What are the Stages of Dementia?

    There are a few different systems used to grade dementia — at the most basic there is early, moderate, and end. Many providers use the system developed by Dr. Barry Reisberg of New York University which includes 7 stages. The Reisberg scale is also known as the GDS or Global Deterioration Scale for Assessment of Primary Degenerative Dementia. This scale focuses primarily on cognitive abilities.

    Dementia Stages in the Reisberg Scale

    Dementia Stages in the FAST Scale

    Dementia Stages in the CDR Scale

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    Take Your Brain For A Walk

    Getting up and moving helps to keep your body and brain strong. Research is unclear on whether exercise prevents dementia, but there are many studies that suggest regular activity is good for your brain. One even showed low dementia risk among very fit women. Physical activity helps prevent other health conditions linked to dementia including:

    • Depression
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure

    Action Strategy: Just do it. Start small but make sure you start. Add a small activity, depending on your level of physical fitness. This could be as simple as walking up and down a hallway a few times or as challenging as a 5-mile hike with friends. Aim to fit 150 minutes of physical movement that gets your heart beating faster into each week.

    Understanding Lewy Body Dementia

    Lewy body dementia consists of two different conditions: dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease dementia. The two share many of the same symptoms and may often be considered to be the same.

    However, one significant factor in how Lewy body dementia progresses is related to which disease is actually present. In Parkinson’s disease dementia, the physical challenges are usually evident first, while in dementia with Lewy bodies, cognitive changes may appear earlier than, about the same time, or shortly after, the physical changes develop.

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    Talking With A Doctor

    After considering the persons symptoms and ordering screening tests, the doctor may offer a preliminary diagnosis or refer the person to a Cognitive Dementia and Memory Service clinic, neurologist, geriatrician or psychiatrist.Some people may be resistant to the idea of visiting a doctor. In some cases, people do not realise, or else they deny, that there is anything wrong with them. This can be due to the brain changes of dementia that interfere with the ability to recognise or appreciate the changes occurring. Others have an insight of the changes, but may be afraid of having their fears confirmed.One of the most effective ways to overcome this problem is to find another reason for a visit to the doctor. Perhaps suggest a check-up for a symptom that the person is willing to acknowledge, such as blood pressure, or suggest a review of a long-term condition or medication.Another way is to suggest that it is time for both of you to have a physical check-up. Any expressed anxiety by the person is an excellent opportunity to suggest a visit to the doctor. Be sure to provide a lot of reassurance. A calm, caring attitude at this time can help overcome the person’s very real worries and fears.Sometimes, your friend or family member may refuse to visit the doctor to ask about their symptoms. You can take a number of actions to get support including:

    • talking with other carers who may have had to deal with similar situations
    • contacting your local Aged Care Assessment Team

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